Woolley & Wallis report Asian Art 2014 ‘highlight’

Salisbury auctioneers Woolley & Wallis, who are renowned as skilful operators in the Asian market, with two 2-day sales a year, have just issued their 2014 Report. Chairman Paul Viney avers ‘Jewellery and Asian Art provided most of the highlights’ in a year in which the company achieved sales of £20,200,000 (premium inclusive). And, indeed, in their jewellery report they point out that ‘The amber market continues to accelerate, encouraged by the strength of the Chinese buyers.’

One of their strongest performers in November’s £3m. + Asian sale was a pair of 18th century Chinese Yongzheng doucai cups. Just 4.5cm. high they, nevertheless, sold to a Chinese buyer for £453,800 (premium incl.).

woolley freys and cups freya

Freya Yuan from Woolley & Wallis’ Asian department shows off one of the tiny top performers in the November 2014 sale.

 

 

Small but perfectly formed, Chinese snuff bottles are taking off . . .

Schnupfer_corrected The snuff box in Europe

Snuff was discovered at the end of the 15th century by Christopher Columbus and his fellow adventurers as they roamed the western side of the Atlantic. But snuff took a while to take off in China. The earliest recorded date on a Chinese snuff bottle is 1644 but they would really take off in the 18th century..While 17th-century Europeans stored their powdered tobacoo in boxes, the humidity in much of China (and the lack of pockets in Chinese garments) necessitated a handheld, airtight repository — and thus the snuff bottle was born.

These tiny vessels were the focus of “Small Delights: Chinese Snuff Bottles,” a yearlong show at The Metropolitan Museum of Art earlier this year. Some of the most sought-after examples exhibited came from the imperial workshops of the Qianlong emperor, a noted patron of the arts.

They were never particularly valued. Indeed. upon meeting a friend or acquaintance in the street it was customary to extend one’s arm (your supply of stuff being secreted in the sleeve) and snuff bottles and contents were duly exchanged.

However, that appears to be changing significantly. Three or four years ago it was relatively easy to pick up interesting Chinese snuff bottles for around £50, sometimes even less. If you hoped to ride a snuff bottle bottle boom, there can be little doubt you are too late.

Several provincial sales this autumn have highlighted the increasing value of Chinese snuff bottles. Two we have been at – Woolley & Wallis in November and Lyon & Turnbull earlier this month – evidenced vastly increased prices for these alluring small objects. To a certain extent, provenance at both auctions played a part although Mary Stewart, the romantic novelist whose collection was dispersed at L&T, was hardly renowned before her death at a world-class Chinese collector. However, she did have good dealers lurking in the background. At the Woolley & Wallis sale some snuff bottle lots got up to 20 times their estimates.

A sale last week online, however, underlines what might confidently be termed an emergent trend. Even more sensational results were achieved by Berlin-based Auctionata.

With intense bidding for every single item, ‘Exceptional Snuff Bottles from a Spanish Collection’ was Auctionata’s first auction to sell out entirely, leading to an impressive overall result of € 161,652 (incl. buyer’s premium).

The auction presented 64 snuff bottles from a private collection in Spain. The small, yet artfully crafted vessels attracted bidders with their impressive diversity of designs and precious materials such as agate, jade, overlay glass and porcelain.

For nearly four hours, Auctioneer Philipp von Hutten and Auctionata’s Senior Specialist for Asian Art, Dr. Arne Sildatke, presented the small but fine artworks to 498 users from 28 different countries. Throughout the auction, bidders from China, Thailand, United Kingdom, Belgium, Switzerland and Germany engaged in heated bidding contests which resulted in hammer prices that surpassed the estimates by far. The most sought after object of the night was a shadow agate snuff bottle with a bird motif and a dark-brown and black grain and a stopper of gilt brass with filigree decoration and round turquoises from the Qing dynasty, which ultimately sold for € 15,600. Another highlight was a shadow agate snuff bottle with telief handles from Qing Dynasty in light brown with a dark brown to black veining which sold for € 11,400 (all prices including buyer’s premium).

The reasoning behind the increased demand for these small but usually perfectly formed objects is hardly difficult to divine. They represent eminently portable wealth. And there is, of course, a pent up demand for wealth which might be transferred across certain national borders without tiresome duties and taxes, and retained as an apparently unostentatious way of investing ones wealth.

 

Shadow Agate Snuff Bottle with Birds, Qing Dynasty

Agate, light brown with a dark brown to black veining. Stopper of gilt brass with filigree decoration and round turqouises and bone spoon. Height: 7 cm.

Sold for € 15,600 (incl. buyer’s premium)

 

Strong prices across the board at Woolley & Wallis Asian sale

There were strong prices across the board at Woolley & Wallis’s 2-day Asian sale in Salisbury. Bidding was not just confined to the crowded room: there were 14 telephone lines active plus the Internet and, of course, there were a large number of Chinese buyers in the room. Woolley & Wallis have well succeeded in bringing in the Chinese buyers, many of whom are regular attenders and they significantly outnumber any local buyers.

woolley telephones

A section of the telephone bank at Woolley & Wallis   Photo Paul Harris

There was an almost festive atmosphere as foreign buyers munched their way through exotic foods in between furiously bidding. The Chinese bidders, many of whom were friends, relentlessly bid against each other. Most of the time the competition was good natured although just occasionally there were some trenchant observations to each other in Mandarin!

It had been expected that the laurels for the sale would go to an early 19th century jade seal with connection to Empress Xiaoyiren. It did not sell in the room (estimated £200,000-300,000) but was sold immediately after the sale (‘a direct after sale’) at a price of £150,000 plus 22% premium. Woolley & Wallis said they were well pleased with the result.

woolley cups

Top sellers in the sale at £378,200

The top sellers in the sale were a pair of tiny Yongzheng (mark and of the period) doucai lingzhi wine cups which well exceeded their estimate to sell for £378,200 (premium inclusive).

The best prices in the sale were during day 1 when the most expensive lots were exposed for sale, although there were strong prices throughout day 2 – and some surprises. A framed and glazed Tibetan thangka, estimated at £500-1,000, sold for a rather better £31,720.

woolley thangka

The surprise Tibetan thangka: £31,720

There were a large number of snuff bottles for sale on day 2 at the beginning of the sale (most from the collection of the late Mr John Ault). The prices achieved bore no relation to the estimates. They sold, sometimes, for ten or, even, twenty times the estimates. They seemed to set the mood for the day and prices remained strong with relatively few passes.

woolley freys and cups freya

Woolley & Wallis’s Chinese expert Freya Yuan shows off one of the pair of doucai cups

The Chinese buyers appeared well pleased with their purchases. For them, it was just another day: the next day they would be off to Duke’s of Dorchester for their Asian sale!

Woolley & Wallis later announced that the two day sale totalled just over £3m. The sale of the Helen Espir Collection of European Decorated Oriental Ceramics (140 lots) took £90,000.

Selected highlights of Asian Art in London demonstrate broad scope of event

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Salisbury auctioneers Woolley & Wallis have a 2-day Asian sale next week, which will include the Helen Espir Collection of decorated porcelain. Highlights of the sale were shown in Duke Street earlier this week.    Photo Paul Harris

We visited some 30 or 40 exhibitions and events associated with this year’s Asian Art in London. In coming days we shall be posting news and features related to the event so do keep watching out – we have already today posted a feature on the artist Daniel Kelly whose work we particularly admire and who is showing at Hanga Ten Gallery in Maddox Street.

1 Laurence Paul Fleur de Lys

On display at Fleur de Lys in Kensington Church Street is this fascinating 19th century painting. Although actually a Japanese painting it is, unusually, of the important Chinese figure, Zhuge Liang who was Chancellor of State for Shu Han during The Three Kingdoms period. He was a trusted confidante and a great and accomplished strategist.

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Toby Bull at the Lyon & Turnbull event at Hakkesan Restaurant     Photo by Paul Harris

Edinburgh-based auctioneers Lyon & Turnbull showed off the highlights of their Asian Sale to take place at the beginning of December – in St. Neots Cambridgeshire(Crosshall Manor). They also staged last Monday evening a fascinating talk by Toby Bull (above), a consultant on fakes and forgery and inter alia a member of the Hong Kong Police Force. We shall report his talk in full on a unique posting next week.

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Freya Yuan of Woolley & Wallis gingerly handles the star item of next week’s sale, the Imperial seal of Empress Xiaoyiren (estimated at £200,000-300,000). Photo Paul Harris

Please look out for forthcoming stories on Chinese export ware, Chinese turquoise porcelain, blanc de chine, fakes and forgeries, what to look out for in Chinese contemporary art, Vietnamese contemporary art and Olympia Art & Antiques Fair Asia exhibitors!

 

The seal’s the deal at Woolley & Wallis

Woolley & Wallis prize lot 250
Lot 250 at Woolley & Wallis, November 12 2014

The prize lot at next week’s 2-day Asian Sale at Salisbury auctioneers Woolley & Wallis has to be a rare large Chinese Imperial dark celadon jade seal of Empress Xiaoyiren, the third wife and short-lived Empress of the Kangxi era. Curiously, the seal was made in 1801 and the Empress actually died in 1689. However, she was awarded posthumous titles by three Emperors: Yongzheng, Quianlong and Jiaqing. The seal, accordingly, dates from the Jiaqing era. It is estimated at £200,000-300,000.

The impressive seal is crafted with a square seal face, robustly carved and pierced on the top with two crouching five-clawed dragons in the round, their bodies intertwined and heads facing in opposite directions, snarling to reveal their fangs, teeth and tongues; their scales, manes and horns well detailed and defined, the seal face carved in relief in both Chinese and Manchu zhuanshu scripts. The finely polished stone is of a greyish green tone with some striations and inclusions, 12.8cm wide x 9cm high.

The provenance is well established: Sir George Sheppard Murray (d.1928), acquired it c.1900, and thence by descent. It was exhibited at The National Gallery of South Africa, Cape Town 1953, no.225, Pl.XI.

There is an interesting historical background to this piece which is detailed in the catalogue. This Imperial seal was acquired between 1888 and 1906 by Sir George Sheppard Murray, a Scottish banker, when he was working as the Managing Director of the Singapore branch of the Mercantile Bank of India. He was credited for his assistance to the Singapore Government in the issuing of bank notes and the establishment of a gold standard. He was awarded a knighthood in 1906 and after his return to the UK resided in Barretstown Castle in County Kildare, which he turned into a successful stud farm.

The seal script can be transcribed: xiao yi wen cheng duan ren xian mu he ke ci hui fengtian zuosheng ren huanghou zhi bao (The Seal of Heaven-Serving, Sage-Auxiliary Benevolent Empress the Filially-Pious, Virtuous, Gentle, Sincere, Upright, Humane, Exemplary, Reverent, Peaceful, Mindful, Benign and Wise).

Empress Xiaoyiren (d.1689) was the Kangxi Emperor’s third empress and also the shortest reigning empress in Chinese history; tragically reigning for just one day. Xiaoyiren’s ancestors, the Tong clan, were native Han Chinese from the Liaodong area in Northeast China. They were instrumental in helping the Manchus defeat the Ming armies, and Xiaoyiren’s paternal aunt was the Shunzhi Emperor’s empress as well as the mother of Kangxi. With such close ties to the Imperial family, the clan was, as an exception, elevated by the Kangxi Emperor to ‘Honorary Manchu’ status and given a Manchu name – Tunggiya Hala (Tong-jia). The Tunggiya clan was one of the most prominent families in the Manchu dynasty, with numerous ministers and three empresses in its illustrious clan history. Xiaoyiren became a Guifei (Noble Consort) in 1677, was promoted to Huangguifei (Imperial Noble Consort) in 1681, a title second only to Empress, and gave birth to a princess in 1683, who died one month later. When Empress Xiaozhaoren, Kangxi’s second, died in 1678, Xiaoyiren became the highest-ranking consort in the court and effectively the Empress. However, although she was quickly promoted to the title of Huangguifei after Xiaozhaoren’s death, she remained a consort for over 10 years and the Empire was without an empress for that period. It was only when she became gravely ill and was dying that Kangxi finally made her Empress on the 9th of the 7th moon, 1689. Alas, she died the next day.

There is much speculation as to why Kangxi did not make her the Empress sooner, which would be in accordance with court customs after the passing of the last empress. It was certainly not because he disliked her. On the contrary, he once praised her to be ‘filially pious by nature, renowned for her fine etiquette, and full of grace and diligence in educating the children’. However, when ministers petitioned him to make her empress he excused himself by saying, ‘I have not considered this matter often’, and delayed it ad infinitum. As soon as he realised that she was probably not long for this world, however, he decreed to make her Empress without delay. His decisiveness showed that he was not against the idea at all, but perhaps some deeper reasons were at work.

Kangxi’s two previous empresses both died young; one in childbirth, aged 22, the other only four years after becoming empress. Although Kangxi was an intelligent and scientifically-minded ruler, he was not completely free from certain deep rooted superstitious beliefs. After the grief of losing two empresses in such quick succession, he perhaps did not want to tempt fate again. And his strategy seemed to have worked for a while, as Xiaoyiren reigned de facto as empress without the title for more than 10 years. This is perhaps the reason why she was not made empress for so long, although tragically this uncertainty probably also contributed to her ill health. After Xiaoyiren’s death, Kangxi did not have another empress again for the rest of his reign.

Xiaoyiren was famed for her parenting skills and was credited for raising several princes, including the future Yongzheng Emperor, Prince Yinzhen. Yinzhen was born to a lowly lady-in-waiting, who had no right in raising a prince according to Qing court etiquette, so Xiaoyiren adopted Yinzhen from birth and raised him as her own. The fact that Yongzheng was adopted by the highest ranking consort in the Court undoubtedly contributed to his status and helped in his ascendancy as the next Emperor. He was deeply grateful to Xiaoyiren, perhaps even more than to his own mother, whose other son, his younger brother, later became the strongest contender to the throne. After Xiaoyiren died she was posthumously awarded titles three times, during the Yongzheng, Qianlong and Jiaqing periods. The awarding of posthumous titles normally coincided with the enthronement of the new Emperor. Thus it was in the first year of Yongzheng’s and Qianlong’s reigns respectively that she attained two more titles. The titled inscribed on the current seal was her final full title, which was awarded in the fourth year of the Jiaqing reign, when the Jiaqing Emperor became the true ruler of China after his father, the Qianlong Emperor the Emperor Emeritus, died that year.

十九世紀    御製碧玉玉璽

印文:孝懿溫誠瑞仁憲穆和恪慈惠奉天佐圣仁皇后

來源:喬治•偰帕德•蒙瑞(逝于1928年)于1888-1906年間購得

展覽:1953年于南非國家博物館展出Cape Town•編號225(上图为展览图录扫描件)

注:孝懿仁皇后(逝于康熙二十八年七月初十)佟佳氏,康熙皇帝的第三位皇后,于康熙二十八年七月初九日冊封為皇后并頒詔按下,但因病重于次日初十申刻崩。同年九月十九日冊謚為孝懿皇后。因其為雍正皇帝的養母,養育四阿哥胤禛近十年之久,故于雍正、乾隆及嘉慶朝累加謚。直至嘉慶四年四月謚號全稱:孝懿溫誠瑞仁憲穆和恪慈惠奉天佐圣仁皇后。

 

Helen Espir Collection for sale at Woolley & Wallis

 

An outstanding collection of European decorated Export porcelain comes up for sale at Woolley & Wallis, with preview days at Asian Art in London next month. We are pleased to be able to publish Helen Espir’s memoir.

The collection will offer 140 lots in a dedicated catalogue from Helen Espir’s own collection.  The items offered span many styles, palettes and subjects including famille verte and famille rose porcelains, others with Imari and Kakiemon decoration.

The Fascination of European decorated Oriental Porcelain.   By Helen Espir

In 1993 at an Antiques Fair at Mentmore in Buckinghamshire I bought a Chinese bowl with red and gold decoration because on the base was engraved N:113 ↑ – the Inventory number of the collection of Augustus the Strong, Elector of Saxony. I was soon dismayed to discover that it had been decorated in Holland because as a collector of Chinese ceramics for over twenty years I had learned to shun such clobbered hybrid objects as being unworthy of a serious collector. However its provenance and attractive appearance persuaded me to defy convention and take a serious interest in European decoration on Oriental porcelain.

What did it look like?  Why was it done? Who did it? Who bought it? How would I recognise it? These were all questions that led me to research a far wider range of subjects than when collecting straight forward Chinese ceramics. These included delftware, European and English ceramics, glassware and European history as well as changes in taste and fashion. I particularly enjoyed the wide range of religious, historic and political subjects depicted on the porcelain, such as the South Sea Bubble and the House of Orange on Dutch decorated pieces, some of which had to be decoded as their message was no longer obvious and had been forgotten. Researching these led to the discovery of delights such as Lord Hervey’s Memoirs of the court of George II, and the amusing letters of Liselotte, Princess Palatine and Duchess of Orleans, at the court of Louis XIV.

The challenge of deciphering the puzzles and the detective work involved is a major fascination of the subject. Nothing is what it seems, everything has been transformed in some way, frequently for commercial reasons. For example, converting plain Chinese blue and white to expensive Japanese Imari by the addition of red and gold or red and green was widespread in Amsterdam & London from 1700 to around 1740.The so-called Amsterdam’s Bont or Dutch Imari being the most common style of decoration in Holland and ranges in quality from exquisite to slapdash.  Another interesting example of commercial enterprise shows how the demand for rare Kakiemon porcelain by the upper classes in the early 18th century was supplied by the Dutch who decorated white Japanese and Chinese porcelain in that style. I found the evidence in the Dutch decorated pieces still at Dresden that were bought by Augustus the Strong before 1727 and listed in the 1721 Dresden Japanese Palace Inventory as genuine.

Also in Dresden, I found Chinese cups and saucers decorated in Bohemia with intricate black or red scrollwork and European figures by Ignaz Preissler, as well as Chinese porcelain with the black or brown glaze engraved with a wheel to show the pattern on the white porcelain, all in the collection by 1721. Daniel & Ignaz Preissler are well known for their chinoiserie decoration, many of their strange images being inspired by 17th century travel books by European visitors to China and Japan

My admiration for Preissler led to the purchase of the blanc de Chine lion joss stick holder illustrated on the cover of the catalogue, lot 390. It is painted on the plinth in schwarzlot with scenes of bear and lion hunts and a mysterious scene of capturing leopards apparently by luring them with drugged bait hanging from the trees. To discover that leopards, or more likely cheetah, were used traditionally in the Middle East, China and India and also in Europe up to the late 17th century in hunting was an extraordinary revelation which continues to intrigue me.

The rarest style of Dutch decoration is known as ‘Fine Line’. It is distinguished by exquisite flower painting typified by the blanc de Chine teapot in lot 384. The decorator, who is unknown, was active in Holland from around 1715-30. The style is very European and in complete contrast to the copies of Japanese kakiemon and Imari and Chinese famille verte and famille rose.

English decoration on Chinese porcelain had long been well known in the Giles workshop flowers and insects style of the 1750s and ‘60s. The discovery of the Limehouse kilnsite and the identification of Limehouse pieces decorated outside the factory led to the identification of English decoration of the 1740s in Kakiemon and famille rose styles. This enabled further attributions of London decoration rather than Dutch on Chinese porcelain earlier in the 18th century. In 2005 Errol Manners published his ground-breaking study of English decoration of Oriental Porcelain from 1700-1750, which transformed our understanding of the subject (ECC Transactions Vol.19, part 1).

My challenge was to try to distinguish between Dutch and English over-decoration. To do this I gathered together groups of Oriental porcelain over-decorated in varying styles to see if there were characteristics that distinguished them from each other. I had identified the use of opaque white enamel as typically English and this led to the separation of Dutch and English famille rose style decorations, lots 382 – 388 and lots 412 – 417. In 2008, Stephen Hanscombe opened up the subject to collectors of English porcelain by including Chinese porcelain with London decoration dating from the early 1700s in his exhibition ‘Early James Giles and his contemporary London decorators’.

So why am I selling my collection, gradually accumulated since 1993? Every piece has been bought for a reason, the majority because I found each one fascinating and attractive, and because they each had a place in the story I was trying to understand, and a few just because of their important place in the history even though I thought they were very unattractive at the time.  Having had the good fortune to have the results of my research and collecting published by Jorge Welsh in 2005 in my book, ‘European Decoration on Oriental Porcelain. 1700-1830’,  I now feel able to pass them on and hope that other collectors will make new discoveries and derive as much pleasure as I have done.

Wednesday 12th November 2014 – a separate catalogue will be available

Viewing: London.  Selected highlights will be on view in London at Brian Haughton Gallery, 15 Duke Street, St James SW1Y 6BD

Monday 3rd November 10am – 4.30pm Tuesday 4th November 10am – 4.30pm

Salisbury viewing for the entire Asian Art Sale

Saturday 8th November 10am – 1.00pm Monday 10th November 10am – 5pm Tuesday 11th November 10am – 7pm Wednesday 9am – 10.30am

Contact: John Axford +44 (0)1722 424506   johnaxford@woolleyandwallis.co.uk Clare Durham +44 (0) 1722 424507   claredurham@woolleyandwallis.co.uk

 

Buyers not chicken over £88,000 chicken bowl

We wrote recently about the world record price of over US$36 million for an original Chenghua chicken cup sold last month by Sotheby’s in Hong Kong. Whilst the originals are few in number and fairly well recorded, they are, of course, heavily copied and in China you can pick up a copy for just a dollar or two.

Which is probably why West of England auctioneers Woolley & Wallis were cautious over an 8 cm. diameter chicken bowl offered in yesterday’s Asian Sale. It was a bit small for a bowl, perhaps, but rather too large to be a cup . . . However, the chicken looked pretty kosher painted in the slightly naïve style associated with Chenghua chickens.

The auctioneers noted in the catalogue the Quianlong seal mark but would only venture that it was ‘probably’ of the period. It did, however, boast a good provenance: from the collection of Lt Col John Grenville Fortescue (1896-1969) of Buckinghamshire and Cornwall (in fact, Woolley & Wallis racked up £300,000 in sales yesterday for items from the Fortescue Collection).

4 chicken bowl Woolley & Wallis

Estimated at £5,000-8,000 – about right for a Quianlong copy – it rocketed up to a hammer price of £88,000. Now we seem sure to see a period when chicken cups and chicken bowls soar to heights previously unknown to the humble chicken.

Woolley & Wallis lion dog roars away at £110,000

330 Woolley Wallis

A fine Chinese white jade carving of a Buddhist lion dog, attributed to the Qianlong period (1736-95) roared away on the first day of the Woolley & Wallis Asian Sale, reaching £110,000 against an estimate of £30-50,000.

A well modelled piece, the beast crouching, its head turned to the right and its ears flattened against its head, with a curling mane and a bushy tail tucked beneath its hind legs, its backbone finely defined, and its teeth bared, it was presented on a hardwood stand carved with lingzhi and pine. Most significantly, in terms of the price it reached, there was affixed a paper label for The Queen Amelia of Portugal Collection.

It was from an English private collection but, before that, was most probably in the collection of Queen Amelia of Portugal.

Princess Amélie d’Orléans (1865-1951), married Carlos, Prince Royal of Portugal in 1886, to become the last Queen consort of Portugal. She was patron and founder of the National Association against Tuberculosis, and was actively involved with other social issues and organisations. Despite this, she was at times criticised for her financial extravagances. In 1910, the Portuguese royal family were exiled to France following the death of Amélie’s son, Manuel II of Portugal, and the subsequent formation of the first Portuguese Republic, and she spent the remainder of her life there.

 

Brush up on brushpots and make a fortune

Six stunning brushpots which made fortunes Re-blogged from the-saleroom.com

The brushpot that sold for £150,000 at Sworders of Stansted Mountfitchet on April 29.

The brushpot that sold for £150,000 at Sworders of Stansted Mountfitchet on April 29.

A £150,000 bid secured a very large ‘Hundred Boys’ Zitan brushpot at Sworders of Stansted Mountfitchet on April 29. It was a stunning five-times-top-estimate price.

Rarity, craftsmanship, subject matter, material, artist, marks, seals, period and Imperial connections are all factors that can affect desirability and price. An Imperial piece from the Emperor’s personal collection created by a leading artist at the zenith of production during the reign of the Qianlong Emperor (1736-95), carved in spinach green or white jade is about as good as it gets, although rare pieces in other materials have been known to outstrip even these.

Here are five outstanding prices for brush pots in recent years. clars6½in (16.5cm) high Chinese underglaze blue porcelain brush pot, attributed to Wang Bu (1898-1968). Sold for $480,000 (£325,000) on February 17, 2012, by Clars of Oakland, California.

wooleey

6½in (16.5cm) high Kangxi (1662-1722) carved ‘landscape’ bitong, or brushpot, made in China by Gu Jue, one of the most famous artists of the period. Sold for £360,000 ($554,400), May 23, 2012, by Woolley & Wallis of Salisbury, England.

christies5in (12.25cm) high Qianlong (1736-95) finely carved and pierced white jade brushpot imbued with auspicious symbols of pine and bamboo. Sold for £430,000 ($662,200), November 11, 2013, by Christie’s, King Street, London.

bonhams6¼in (16cm) high Qianlong (1736-95) Yixing stoneware slip-decorated brushpot, signed Yang Jichu. Sold for HK$5.6m/$666,500 (£430,000), May 27, 2012, by Bonhams Hong Kong.

sothebysExtremely rare 4¾in (12cm) high mark and period Qianlong (1736-95) seal famille rose heaven and earth revolving brushpot constructed in three parts. Sold for $1.7m (£1.13m), March 20, 2012, Sotheby’s New York.

More at: http://blog.the-saleroom.com/asian-art/six-stunning-brushpots-fortunes-attached/?

£200,000 seal sold at Woolley & Wallis

The highest price achieved at Woolley & Wallis’s two day Asian Art sale this week was £200,000 for a Chinese Imperial celadon jade seal. Estimated pre-sale at £30,000-40,000 it galloped well ahead of expectations. Thought to be 19th century, possibly earlier, the seal is 14.5cm. high and 13.5cm. wide and features a finely sculpted crouching dragon.

096 lot woolley wallis

The sale featured just under 900 lots and the total realised was £2.4m. A pair of blue and white Ming-style altar candlesticks, on which pre-sale hopes focused, were sold at £170,000 against an estimate of £80,000=120,000. Comparison with similar objects in public collections internationally would suggest they are Quianlong, probably from the 1740s.

Asian art auctions – UK Nationwide January-December 2017

Featured

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January 21 Semleys, Shaftesbury Art & Antiques (incl. Asian) www.semleyauctioneers.com

January 25 John Nicholson’s Auctions, Fernhurst Fine Oriental Works of Art

January 25-6 Hannams, Selborne Fine Art & Antiques (incl. Asian) www.hannamsauctioneers.com

January 26 Capes Dunn, Manchester Decorative Art, European & Oriental Ceramics & Glass www.capesdunn.com

January 26 McTears, Glasgow Asian Works of Art www.mctears.co.uk

February 21 Dreweatts, Newbury Interiors (incl. 60 Asian lots) www.dreweatts.com

February 23 Duke’s, Dorchester Ceramics, Glass & Furniture (includes 234 Asian lots) www.dukes-auctions.com

February 23-4 Hannams, Selborne Fine Art & Antiques (incl. Asian) www.hannamsauctioneers.com

February 28 Chiswick Auctions Asian Art www.chiswickauctions.co.uk

March 1 Adam Partridge, Liverpool Antiques & Collectors’ Items with Oriental & Asian Works of Art www.adampartridge.co.uk

March 22 Bonhams, Edinburgh Asian Art www.bonhams.com

March 22 Lyon and Turnbull, Edinburgh Asian Works of Art www.lyonandturnbull.com

March 30-31 Hannams, Selborne Fine Art & Antiques (incl. Asian) www.hannamsauctioneers.com

April 19 Capes Dunn, Manchester European & Oriental Ceramics, Glass and Ivories www.capesdunn.com

April 20 Tooveys, Sussex Asian & Islamic Ceramics & Works of Art www.tooveys.com

April 26  Mallams, Cheltenham Chinese Art www.mallams.co.uk

April 26 John Nicholson’s Asian Art Collection from the Estate of Maurice Collis www.johnnicholsons.com

May 5 Hannams, Selborne Two Day Sale including 500 lots of Asian Art www.hannamsauctioneers.com

May 8 Bonhams, London Knightsbridge Asian Art www.bonhams.com

May 9 Sworders, Mountfitchet Asian Art www.sworder.co.uk

May 9  Lyon & Turnbull in London Scholars’ Rocks: Fine Asian Works of Art www.lyonandturnbull.com

May 10 Sotheby’s London Asian Art www.sothebys.com

May 11 Eastbourne Auctions Oriental Ceramics (part of 3 day sale) www.eastbourneauction.com

May 12 Christies South Kensington Asian Art www.christies.com

May 13 Coldingham Borders Auctions, Berwickshire Art, Antiques & Collectables including Asian www.coldinghambordersauctions.co.uk

May 13 Clarkes Auctions, Semley General Sale with Asian www.clarkesauctions.co.uk

May 13 Semleys, Wiltshire Asian Sale http://www.semleyauctioneers.com

May 15 Chiswick Auctions Asian Art www.chiswickauctions.co.uk

May 16 Dreweatts & Bloomsbury, Newbury Asian Art www.dreweatts.com

May 16-17 Woolley & Wallis, Salisbury Asian Art www.woolleyandwallis.co.uk

May 18 Dukes of Dorchester Asian Art www.dukes-auctions.com

May 18 Ewbanks, Surrey Asian Sale www.ewbankauctions.co.uk

May 24 25 Blythe Road, London European & Asian Art www.25blytheroad.com

June 27 Roseberys, London Asian Art www.roseberys.co.uk

June 28 Capes Dunn, Manchester European & Oriental Ceramics, Glass and Ivories www.capesdunn.com

July 12 Bonhams, Edinburgh Asian Art www.bonhams.com

August 24 McTears, Glasgow Asian Works of Art www.mctears.co.uk

August 24 Hannams, Selborne Asian Art (part of general antiques sale) http://www.hannamsauctioneers.com

September 5 Chiswick Auctions Asian Art www.chiswickauctions.co.uk

September 6 John Nicholson’s Fine Oriental Works of Art www.johnnicholsons.com

September 13 Lyon & Turnbull, Edinburgh Asian Art www.lyonandturnbull.com

September 14 Dukes of Dorchester Ceramics, Asian Art, etc.www.dukes-auctions.com

September 14 Eastbourne Auctions Fine Art & Antique Sale (Oriental section) www.eastbourneauction.com

October 4 John Nicholson’s Oriental Sale www.johnnicholsons.com

October 5 Toovey’s, West Sussex Asian & Islamic Ceramics & Works of Art www.tooveys.com

October 17 Kidson-Trigg Antiques, Art incl Asian www.kidsontrigg.co.uk

October 19 Tayler & Fletcher Antiques, Art incl Asian www.taylerandfletcher.co.uk

October 24 Chiswick Auctions Fine Oriental Sale www.chiswickauctions.co.uk

October 25 Mallams, Cheltenham Chinese Art (part of 2-day Asian sale) www.mallams.co.uk

November 6-7 Bonhams London Asian Art www.bonhams.com

November 7 Christie’s London, Chinese Ceramics & Works of Art www.christies.com

November 7 Sworder’s, Stansted Asian Art www.sworder.co.uk

November 8 Lyon & Turnbull, London Asian Works of Art www.lyonandturnbull.com

November 8 Sotheby’s London Important Chinese Art www.sothebys.com

November 8 John Nicholsons Oriental Art www.johnnicholsons.com

November 9 Bonhams, London Fine Chinese Art www.bonhams.com

November 9 Bellmans Art, Antiques incl. Asian Art www.bellmans.co.uk

November 9 Ewbank’s Asian Art www.ewbankauctions.co.uk

November 13 Chiswick Auctions London Fine Chinese Paintings & Asian Art I www.chiswickauctions.co.uk

November 14 Chiswick Auctions Asian Art II www.chiswickauctions.co.uk

November 14-15  Woolley & Wallis, Salisbury Asian Art http://www.woolleyandwallis.co.uk

November 14 Dreweatts & Bloomsbury, Newbury Asian Art www.dreweatts.com

November 14 Kidson-Triggg Including Asian www.kidsontrigg.co.uk

November 15 Dreweatts Chinese & European Ceramics & Glass www.dreweatts.com

November 16 Dukes of Dorchester Asian Art www.dukes-auctions.com

November 16  McTears, Glasgow Asian Works of Art mctears.co.ukco.uk

November 16 Cheffins, Cambridge The Oriental Sale www.cheffins.co.uk

November 22 Halls, Shrewsbury Asian Art www.hallsgb.com

November 22 Matthew Barton European & Asian Works of Art www.matthewbartonltd.com

November 29 Chiswick Auctions Fine Oriental Carpets & Rugs www.chiswickauctions.co.uk

November 30 Toovey’s Sale incl Asian Ceramics & Works of Art www.tooveys.com

December 5 Bonhams, Edinburgh Asian Art www.bonhams.com

December 5 Roseberys London Asian Art www.roseberys.co.uk

December 19 Hansons, Derbyshire Antiques, etc. including Asian www.hansonsauctioneers.co.uk

 

January – November 2016 Diary Dates January 12  McTears, Glasgow Asian Works of Art  www.mctears.co.uk January 20 Bearnes, Hampton, Littlewood, Exeter Oriental & European Ceramics & Glass www.bhandl.co.uk January 22/3  John Nicholsons, Fernhurst Oriental & Fine Antiques www.johnnicholsons.com January 24 Semley Auctioneers, Shaftesbury Oriental & Islamic Ceramics & Works of Art www.semleyauctioneers.com January 26  Capes Dunn, Heaton Mersey, Cheshire European & Oriental Ceramics & Glass www.capesdunn.com January 27 Hannam’s, Selborne Oriental Works of Art www.hannamsauctioneers.com February 18-19 Dukes of Dorchester An Important European Private Collection, Ceramics, Asian Art & Furniture www.dukes-auctions.com February 18-19 Hannam’s, Selborne Fine Antiques & Collectables  A general sale but with more than 200 Chinese lots www.hannamsauctioneers.com February 19 John Nicholsons, Fernhurst Oriental Sale www.johnnicholsons.com February 23-4 Dreweatts Donnington Priory Interiors Includes more than 100 Chinese lots www.dreweatts.com February 23 Chiswick Auctions, London Asian Art www.chiswickauctions.co.uk February 23 Gorringes Interiors & Art Many Chinese lots www.gorringes.co.uk February 25 Tooveys, West Sussex Asian & Islamic Ceramics & Works of Art www.tooveys.com March 18 John Nicholsons, Fernhurst Oriental Sale www.johnnicholsons.com March 22 Lyon & Turnbull at Edinburgh rooms Fine Asian Works of Art www.lyonand turnbull.com March 23  Bonhams, Edinburgh Asian Art www.bonhams.com April 7  Cheffins, Cambridge Oriental Sale www.cheffins.co.uk April 21 Tooveys, West Sussex Asian & Islamic Ceramics & Works of Art www.tooveys.com April 27 John Nicholson’s Haslemere Oriental Sale www.johnnicholsons.com April 27/8 Mallams, Cheltenham Chinese, Indian, Islamic and Japanese art www.mallams.co.uk April 28/9 Hannams, Selborne Asian Art www.hannamsauctioneers.com

May 9 Bonhams Knightsbridge, London Asian Art www.bonhams.com

May 10  Sworders, Stansted Asian Art www.sworder.co.uk

May 10 Christie’s King Street Chinese Art www.christies.com

May 11 Sotheby’s New Bond St London Chinese Art www.sothebys.com

May 11 Halls, Kidderminster Shropshire Asian Sale www.hallsgb.com

May 12 Bonhams New Bond St London Fine Chinese Art www.bonhams.com

May 11/13 Christie’s South Kensington Ceramics, Works of Art & Textiles www.christies.com

May 14 Railtons Wooler Northumberland Antiques Sale features 52 Chinese lots www,jimrailton.com

May 14 Semley Auctioneers, Shaftesbury Asian Art www.semleyauctioneers.com

May 16 Chiswick Auctions, London Asian Art www.chiswickauctions.co.uk

May 17 Dreweatts & Bloomsbury Chinese Ceramics & Asian Works of Art www.dreweatts.com

May 17/18 Woolley & Wallis, Salisbury Asian Art www.woolleyandwallis.co.uk

May 20 Duke’s Auctioneers, Dorchester Asian Art www.dukes-auctions.com

May 24 25 Blythe Road Auctions, London European & Asian Works of Art www.25blytheroad.com

May 25  Gorringes, Lewes Asian Art www.gorringes.co.uk

May 25 Chorleys, Gloucester Asian Works of Art www.chorleys.com

May 31 McTears, Glasgow Asian Sale www.mctears.co.uk

June 21 Lyon & Turnbull at Crosshall Manor, Cambs. Fine Asian Art www.lyonand turnbull.com

June 21 Bonhams Knightsbridge Home & Interiors including Asian Art (144 lots) www.bonhams.com

June 29 John Nicholson’s, Haslemere Oriental Auction www.johnnicholsons.com

June 29 Roseberys London Asia: the art of symbolism www.roseberys.co.uk

June 30 Dreweatts, Donnington Priory Interiors (48 Asian lots) www.dreweatts.com

July 13 Bonhams, Edinburgh Asian Art www.bonhams.com

August 9 McTears, Glasgow Asian Sale www.mctears.co.uk

August 11 Cheffins, Cambridge Oriental Sale www.cheffins.co.uk

August 23 Dreweatts, Donnington Priory Interiors (to include Oriental section) www.dreweatts.com

August 25 Hannams, Selborne Fine Antiques & Oriental Works of Art www.hannams.auctioneers.com

September 2 John Nicholson’s Fine Oriental Works of Art www.johnnicholsons.com

September 6 Chiswick Auctions Asian Art www.chiswickauctions.co.uk

September 14 Plymouth Auction Rooms Chinese Ceramics & Works of Art www.plymouthauctions.co.uk

September 28-30 Bamfords, Derby Fine Art & Antique Sale (includes 200 lots of Asian art) www.bamfords-auctions.co.uk

Sdeptember 29-30 Hannams, Selborne Fine European & Oriental Works of Art (400 Oriental lots) www.hannamsauctioneers.com

October  6 Tooveys Asian & Islamic Ceramics & Works of Art www.tooveys.com

October 25 Dreweatts Castle Donnington Interiors (120 Asian lots) www.dreweatts.com

October 26 & 27 Mallams, Cheltenham Chinese, Japanese, Indian & Islamic Art www.mallams.co.uk

November 1 Capes Dunn, Manchester European & Oriental Ceramics, Glass & Ivories www.capesdunn.com

November 2 Bellmans, Winchester Asian Art www.bellmans.co.uk

November 3 Adam Partridge, Cheshire Asian Art www.adampartridge.co.uk

November 3 Hannams, Selborne Oriental & European Works of Art www.hannamsauctioneers.com

November 4 McTears Glasgow Asian Works of Art www.mctears.co.uk

November 5 Andrew Smith & Son, Winchester Asian Ceramics & Works of Art www.andrewsmithandson.com

November 7 Bonhams Knightsbridge, London Asian Art www.bonhams.com

November 8 Lyon & Turnbull in London at Asia House Fine Works of Asian Art www.lyonandturnbull.com

November 9 Christies South Kensington Chinese Ceramics, Art & Textiles www.christies.com

November 9 Sothebys London Chinese Art www.sothebys.com

November 9 Gorringes, Lewes Asian Art www.gorringes.co.uk

November 9 Halls, Shrewsbury Asian Art www.hallsgb.com/fineart

November 10 Bonhams New Bond Street, Fine Chinese Art www.bonhams.com

November 10 Ewbanks Asian & Eastern Art www.ewbankauctions.co.uk

November 10 Thomson Roddick Scottish Auctions Antiques including Asian & Oriental Works of Art www.trscottishauctions.com

November 11-12 John Nicholson’s, Surrey Asian incl. Max Lowenson Collection (November 11) www.johnnicholsons.com

November 12 Semley Auctioneers Oriental & Islamic Ceramics www.semleyauctioneers.com

November 14 Chiswick Auctions London Asian Art www.chiswickauctions.co.uk

November 14 Kidson Trigg Oriental Auction www.kidsontrigg.co.uk/auction

November 15 Bonhams Knightsbridge Home & Interiors including Asian Art www.bonhams.com

November 15 Dreweatts & Bloomsbury Castle Donnington Chinese Ceramics & Asian Works of Art www.dnfa.com

November 15/16 Woolley & Wallis, Salisbury Asian Art www.woolleyandwallis.co.uk

November 16 Bonhams, Edinburgh Asian Art www.bonhams.com

November 17 Cheffins, Cambridge Oriental Sale www.cheffins.co.uk

November 18 Dukes, Dorchester Asian Art www.dukes.com

November 23 Matthew Barton at 25 Blythe Road, London Asian Works of Art www.matthewbartonltd.com

November 24 Stride & Son, Chichester Oriental Ceramics & Works of Art www.stridesauctions.co.uk

November 25 Thomson, Roddick & Medcalf, Edinburgh Antiques including Oriental Art www.thomsonroddick.com

November 29 Sworders, Stansted Asian Art www.sworder.co.uk    

December 1 Toovey’s Asian & Islamic Ceramics & Works of Art www.tooveys.com

December 7 Roseberys London Asian Art www.roseberys.co.uk

December 7 Dreweatts & Bloomsbury London Oriental Manuscripts & Miniatures www.bloomsburyauctions.com

December 9 McTears Glasgow Asian Works of Art www.mctears.co.uk

December 13 Dreweatts & Bloomsbury Castle Donnington Asian Ceramics, Furniture & Works of Art www.dnfa.com

 

 

PAST June to December 2015 Diary Dates July 7 McTears, Glasgow Asian Works of Art www.mctears.co.uk July 8 Bonhams Edinburgh Asian Art www.bonhams.com July 14 Bonhams, Oxford British & European Ceramics, Glass and Asian Art www.bonhams.com July 30 Dukes of Dorchester Ceramics, Asian Art & Furniture www.dukes-auctions.com September 1 Chiswick Auctions, London Asian Art www.chiswickauctions.co.uk September 15 McTears, Glasgow Asian Works of Art www.mctears.co.uk September 23 Bonhams Knightsbridge Asian Art www.bonhams.com October 21 Mallams, Cheltenham Asian & Islamic Art www.mallams.co.uk October 30 Hannams, Selborne, Hants Fine Oriental Art www.hannamsauctioneers.com November 3 Capes Dunn, Manchester Oriental & European Ceramics & Glassware www.capesdunn.com November 5 Ewbanks, Send, Surrey Asian & Eastern Art www.ewbankauctions.co.uk November 5-6 John Nicholson’s Oriental Auction www.johnnicholsons.com November 9 Bonhams Knightsbridge Asian Art www.bonhams.com November 10 Sworders Mountffitchet, Stansted Asian Art www.sworder.co.uk November 10 Christie’s King Street, London Fine Chinese Ceramics & Works of Art www.christies.com November 11 Christie’s South Kensington, London Chinese Ceramics & Works of Art www.christies.com November 11 Sothebys London Classical Chinese Furniture from a European Private Collection www.sothebys.com November 11 Sothebys London Important Chinese Art www.sothebys.com November 11 Halls, Kidderminster Asian Art www.hallsgb.com November 12 Dukes of Dorchester Asian Art www.dukes-auctions.com November 12 Bonhams, London New Bond Street Fine Chinese Art www.bonhams.com November 12 Cheffins, Cambridge The Oriental Sale www.cheffins.co.uk November 13 Christie’s South Kensington Chinese Ceramics & Works of Art www.christies.com November 16 Dreweatts Chinese Ceramics & Asian Works of Art www.dreweatts.com November 16 Sworders Asian Art www.sworder.co.uk November 16 The Swan at Tetsworth Asian Art www.theswan.co.uk November 17 McTears, Glasgow Asian Works of Art www.mctears.com November 17/18 Woolley & Wallis, Salisbury Asian Art www.woolleyandwallis.co.uk November 18 Bonhams, Edinburgh Asian Art www.bonhams.com November 18 Peter Francis Auctioneers, Carmarthen Antiques & Fine Art To include Chinese ceramics www.peterfrancis.co.uk November 25-26 Mellors & Kirk Fine Art Sale Includes Asian Art www.mellorsandkirk.com December 1 Lyon & Turnbull (Edinburgh) at Crosshall Manor, Cambridgeshire Fine Asian Works of Art www.lyonandturnbull.co.uk December 9 Dreweatts Donnington Priory, Newbury Pictures, Asian & European Ceramics, Furniture and Works of Art www.dreweatts.com December 11 Hannams, Selborne, Hants Fine European & Oriental Works of Art www.hannamsauctioneers.com   January to June 2015 Diary Dates January 6 Dreweatts & Bloomsbury, Newbury, Berks Pictures, Ceramics & Asian Works of Art www.dreweatts.com January 20 Capes Dunn & Co., Manchester European & Oriental Ceramics, Works of Art and Glass www.capesdunn.com January 21 John Nicholson’s, Haslemere, Surrey Oriental Sale www.johnnicholsons.com January 23 Hannam’s, Selborne Fine Oriental & European Works of Art www.hannamsauctioneers.com January 24 Semley Auctioneers, Shaftesbury, Dorset Oriental & Islamic Ceramics and Works of Art (part sale) www.semleyauctioneers.com February 10 Chiswick Auctions, London Asian Art www.chiswickauctions.co.uk February 17 McTears, Glasgow Asian Works of Art www.mctears.co.uk February 19-20 Duke’s, Dorchester Ceramics, Asian Art and Furniture www.dukes-auctions.com Part Asian sale February 25 Gorringes, Lewes Fine Art, Antiques & Collactables (160 Chinese lots in a large 2-day general sale) www.gorringes.co.uk February 25 Bonhams, Knightsbridge Asian Art www.bonhams.com February 26 Dominic Winter, Cirencester Oriental Ceramics & Jade, Tribal & Sailor art, Silver, Jewellery & Furniture Part Asian sale www.dominicwinter.co.uk February 26 Tooveys, West Sussex Asian Art www.tooveys.com March 4-5 John Nicholson’s, Haslemere Oriental Two-Day Sale www.johnnicholsons.com March 6 Hannam’s, Selborne Fine Oriental & European Works of Art  www.hannamsauctioneers.com March 25 Bonhams, Edinburgh Asian Art  www.bonhams.com/locations/EDI/ March 26 Cheffins, Cambridge Oriental Sale www.cheffins.co.uk April 23 Tooveys, West Sussex Asian Art www.tooveys.com April 30 Mallams, Cheltenham Asian, Oriental & Islamic Works of Art www.mallams.co.uk May 5 2015 Chiswick Auctions, London Asian Art www.chiswickauctions.co.uk May 15 Dukes of Dorchester, Asian Art www.dukes-auctions.com May 19 Sworders, Stansted Mountfitchet Asian Art www.sworder.co.uk May 20/21 Woolley & Wallis, Salisbury Asian Art www.woolleyandwallis.co.uk May 29 Adam Partridge, Macclesfield Asian Works of Art & Musical Instruments An interesting combination sale   www.adampartridge.co.uk June 5 Hannams, Selborne, Hants Fine European & Oriental Works of Art  www.hannamsauctioneers.com June 10 John Nicholson’s, Haslemere Oriental Auction www.johnnicholsons.com June 15/16   Lyon & Turnbull, Crosshall Manor, St Neots, Cambridgeshire Asian Sale www.lyonandturnbull.com June 24 Gorringes, Lewes, Sussex Fine Art, Antiques & Collectables (including more than 300 lots of Asian art, mainly Chinese) www.gorringes.com   Past Auctions 2014 Winter-Spring 2014 January 21 Kidson-Trigg Auctioneers, Swindon, Wiltshire  Specialist Oriental and Silver, Jewellery, Objets d’Art & Collectables February 5 Gorringes, Lewes, Sussex  Fine Art, Antiques & Collectables (includes more than 100 Chinese lots) February 13 Lyon & Turnbull, Edinburgh Asian Art February 19 Bonhams, London Knightsbridge Asian Art February 19-20 John Nicholson Auctioneers, Haslemere, Surrey Oriental Sale February 27  Tooveys, Worthing, Sussex Asian and Islamic Ceramics and Works of Art February 28 Dreweatts & Bloomsbury, Donnington Priory Silver (not a Chinese specific sale but there are 13 Lots of Chinese silver) March 4 McTears Glasgow Asian Art March 7 British Bespoke Auctions, Winchcombe, Glos., Oriental Sale March 8 Paul Beighton Auctioneers, Rotherham Antique, Fine Art & Decorative (approx. 170 Asian lots) March 12 Dreweatts & Bloomsbury, Donnington Priory Interiors and Asian Works of Art March 20 Thomson Roddick, Edinburgh Antiques and Oriental and Asian Works of Art (includes approx. 100 Asian items) March 26 Bonhams, Edinburgh Asian Art March 27 Cheffins, Cambridge Oriental Sale April 2 John Nicholson’s, Haslemere, Surrey Oriental Sale April 15 Kidson-Trigg Auctioneers, Swindon, Wiltshire Oriental Sale April 24  Tooveys, Worthing, Sussex Oriental Sale April 29 Sworders, Stansted Mountfitchet Asian Art April 30 Mallams, Cheltenham Asian, Oriental & Islamic Art May 12 Bonhams London, Knightsbridge Asian Art May 13 Christie’s, King Street London Fine Chinese Ceramics & Works of Art and The C Philip Cardeiro Collection of Chinese Art May 13 Mctears, Glasgow Asian Works of Art May 14 Dreweatts & Bloomsbury, Donnington Priory Chinese Ceramics & Asian Works of Art May 15 Bonhams London, New Bond Street, Fine Chinese Art May 16 Christie’s South Kensington, Chinese May 21/22 Woolley & Wallis, Salisbury, Wiltshire  Specialist Chinese & Japanese Works of Art May 22/23 Chorleys, Gloucester Asian Sale May 29 Ewbank’s, Send, Surrey, Chinese, Japanese, and Eastern Works of Art, Ceramics, Costumes & Textiles May 31 Paul Beighton Auctioneers, Rotherham Antique Furniture, Fine Art & Decorative Objects A general 2-day sale with some 114 lots of Chinese interest on Day 1     June-December 2014 Diary Dates June 4 Lyon & Turnbull, Edinburgh Asian Art June 12 Thomson Roddick, Edinburgh Antiques & Works of Art Includes Oriental section June 19  Tooveys, Worthing, Sussex  Oriental Sale July 2 Bonhams, Edinburgh Asian Art July 2 John Nicholson Auctioneers, Haslemere Oriental Art July 15 Kidson-Trigg, Swindon Specialist Oriental Sale July 22 Mctears, Glasgow Asian Works of Art August 14  Tooveys, Worthing, Sussex  Oriental Sale September 3 Crow’s Art Gallery, Dorking Asian & Islamic Art September 11 Bonhams London, Knightsbridge Asian Art September 5 Hannam’s, Selborne, Hants. Fine Oriental & European Works of Ar September 30 Mctears, Glasgow Asian Works of Art October 8 Dreweatts & Bloomsbury, Newbury Asian Art, Paintings, Prints, Ceramics & Clocks October 9 Cheffins, Cambridge Oriental Sale October 14 Kidson-Trigg, Swindon Specialist Oriental Sale October 14 High Road Auctions, Chiswick Antiques, Fine Art & Collectables, to include a private collection of Chinese Works of Art October 14 Capes Dunn & Co, Manchester European & Oriental Ceramics, Works of Art & Glass October 22 Mallams, Cheltenham Asian, Oriental & Islamic Asian Art in London Series November 3 Bonhams London, Knightsbridge Asian Art November 4 Christie’s, South Kensington London Chinese Ceramics & Works of Art November 5 Sotheby’s London, New Bond Street Fine Chinese Ceramics & Works of Art November 5 Halls Fine Art, Battllefield, Shrewsbury Asian Art Sale November 5-6 Brightwells, Leominster Autumn Two Day Fine Art Sale includes The Julia Gibbons Chinese Art Collection (57 items) November 6 Bonhams, London New Bond Street Fine Chinese Art, The Roy Davids Collection of Chinese Ceramics November 7 Christie’s South Kensington, London Chinese Ceramics, Works of Art & Textiles   November 7 The Cheshire Saleroom, Macclesfield Chinese, Japanese & Eastern Works of Art November 10 Dreweatts & Bloomsbury Auctions Chinese Ceramics and Asian Works of Art November 11 Sworders, Stansted Mountfitchet Asian Art November 11 Kidson-Trigg, Swindon Specialist Oriental Sale November 12/13 Woolley & Wallis, Salisbury Asian Art November 14 Dukes, Dorchester Asian Art November 19 Bonhams, Edinburgh Asian Art December 2 Lyon & Turnbull, Edinburgh Fine Asian Works of Art To be held at Crosshall Manor, St Neots December 3 Hansons Auctioneers, Etwall, Derbyshire Winter Fine Art Sale to include approx. 50 pieces of Chinese jade from Masalski collection December 4 Tooveys, Worthing, Sussex Asian & Islamic Ceramics and Works of Art December 9 Mctears Glasgow, Asian Works of Art December 10/11 John Nicholson’s, Haslemere Two Day Oriental Sale December 18 Wellers, Chertsey, Surrey Silver and Oriental Auction