Reflections on November’s Chinese auctions from an online bidder’s point of view

online auctions3  We wrote a few weeks ago about the plethora of Chinese art auctions during November, the difficulties of getting around them all and our decision to, instead, bid online (http://chineseart.co.uk/blog/welcome-to-november-and-a-uk-asian-auction-virtually-every-day/). Well, it has certainly been a highly instructive experience to attempt to do all our buying online and we thought it might be interesting to record our very mixed experiences.

In all, we bid on just nine auctions, two of which we viewed and the balance viewed either online or from a catalogue supplied by the auctioneers. Bidding was generally successful in digital terms although there some notable failures. We registered on Dreweatts own site for their Asian Sale at Castle Donnington. Unfortunately, it was a disaster. We were interested in the section in which the Peter Arlidge Collection of Song ceramics was to sold and had identified three lots we were determined to buy. Horror of horrors, when we depressed the BID button, absolutely nothing happened and it was clear our bids were not registering at all. We rebooted and re-registered but the bids we made took so long to register that the lots were sold before we could get into the running. In one instance, by the time our bid of £110 was registered on the screen, bidding had already reach £700! We got nothing and were very disappointed . . .

We successfully bid in the Lyon & Turnbull London sale (having previously viewed it) although there was anasty shock using the Invaluable site: after just three lots (none of which we bid on) an electronic notice flashed up on the screen saying se had exhausted our £10,000 credit limit! I had a sudden fear that our feline friend had wandered across the keyboard and bid on our behalf! Fortuitously, I had L&T’s number in London and called them and they reinstated our ability to bid with a new £50,000 limit.

Later in the week, we viewed a sale at Borders Auctions in Hawick which had a couple of dozen serious Chinese interest items. The night before the sale we filed a dozen Autobids with The-Saleroom.com. This turned out to be a lucky move as the connection with the auction came and went with multiple freezes which lasted for five or ten minutes a time. In the event, we got everything we wanted using our recorded auto-bids. If we had relied on bidding live we might have just got half of them.

The other sales we participated in went much more smoothly. Having bid successfully, of course, we then had the challenge of getting our lots back to our location in the Scottish Borders. We found the prices quoted by The-Saleroom’s affiliate Mailboxes Etc far too expensive: on one three-figure lot bought from Dukes, the cost of packing and carriage exceeded the cost of the lot itself. We got a much more competitive price from the specialist fine art carriers Aardvark which was a third of that quoted by Mailboxes Etc. From a couple of the houses, we drove and collected ourselves which was cheaper and less stressful.

Our verdict on the success or otherwise of our experimental new strategy has to be that physical attendance at a sale where there are items of even modest interest has to be a must. We shall probably bid in fewer auctions, but we shall try to get there ourselves and simply put the miles on the clock rather than hours behind the screen!

Busy, indeed, but no sensations . . . we look at an auction-packed week

Last week was one of the busiest weeks of the year in the UK Chinese art market calendar with major Asian auctions held at Chiswick Auctions, Dreweatts & Bloomsbury (Donnington Priory), Woolley & Wallis (Salisbury) and Duke’s in Dorchester. We attended all these auctions and, indeed, were buyers at all four and, further, visited Halls in Shrewsbury to collect purchases from the previous week’s Asian sale.

Prices held steady throughout all the auctions. There was no evidence of any collapse in the Chinese market. There were Chinese buyers evident at all the sales. There were not so many of them as in recent years but those who were evident on the ground were all serious buyers. Good things, generally speaking, sold well and although there were no sensations in terms of prices achieved, there were good solid results at all the houses.

May auctions (15)

Calm before the storm. Chiswick auction room before the sale. Picture by Paul Harris

In financial terms, the Chiswick sale was particularly good for the auction house and its vendors. A large number of lots estimated in the low hundreds climbing into the many thousands surprised those of us in the room. A pile of sundry books sold for £2,000 (one particular book being a sought after item). The sale started well with the first 69 lots coming from the collection of John Marriott and Count R L Sangorski. Purchased from major dealers like Spink and auction houses like Christies, these lots, many accompanied by the original invoices, sold spectacularly well, generally exceeding their estimates. Progress during the sale was painfully slow thanks to half a dozen telephone lines in almost constant use and the usual internet bidders. Around 50 lots per hour was achieved.

For Chiswick, this was their best sale ever seen in its 25 year history. It achieved an 85% sold rate with 82 lots from the Marriott collection bringing in £84,000 including premium. There were also strong results from Transitional period blue and white and photographic albums up for sale.May auctions (32)

Dreweatts sale at Donnington Priory  Photo by Paul Harris

At Dreweatts & Bloomsbury’s delightfully sited auction  room at Donnington Priory, near to Newbury, things were a little less frenetic despite there being several internet connections for bidders. The auctioneer welcomed the fact that there were around 40 active buyers in the room (approximately half Chinese) and commented on how unusual it was. Despite the many ways available to buy (half a dozen telephone lines, four Internet servers and room bidding), it was still possible to buy well, especially for those in the room. Chinese buyers ascribed their good luck to the presence in the room of a large ceramic statue of the Chinese leader Mao Tse Tung!

May auctions (26)

Mao Tse Tung presided over the Asian Sale at Dreweatts & Bloomsbury, Donnington Priory.  Photo by Paul Harris courtesy Chinese Art in Scotland

There were certainly a few ‘sleepers’. We think we found one in the form of a mid-to-late 19th century Chinese stick stand very well decorated with dragons and bearing the original label of the vendor, Charles Sleight of London’s Royal Arcade, which pinned down the date of sale to the 1880s.

Dreweatts stick stand (15)

Dragon decoration on a 19th century stick stand sold by Charles Sleight, London, around 1880. Photo by Paul Harris

At the same time as the Dreweatts sale there was day one of the Woolley & Wallis two day sale in Salisbury. The first day always tends to be the most expensive at Woolleys and this was no exception. There were many lots in five figures but no sensations. The sale was dominated by telephone internet with only a dozen or so people in the room. This number was considerably larger the following day, a reflection of the more modest, attainable prices. However, if you had wanted the catalogue raisonne of the ceramic works in the Imperial Palace Museum, Beijing, you would not have got it for a few hundred pounds . . .  it was knocked down after competitive bidding at £11,000! Stands also fared particularly well: one lot with half a dozen rather attractive stands got £3,800. There were few bargains to be had, all in all.

For those who needed a rest from the seemingly relentless circuit, Thursday was a day of rest, so to speak. We took the opportunity to view the Friday sale at Duke’s in Dorchester. Amongst the fine things seen was a large, black jade Buddha which would actually fail to sell! We spotted a number of things, however, which we were able to secure bidding on the Internet the following day.

113 dukes Sold at Duke’s

Famille rose box with relief moulded figures and Qianlong mark to base but probably later, £1170 inclusive of premium

 

It’s a busy auction week in the UK!

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Viewing at Dreweatts & Bloomsbury Asian Sale on Tuesday of this week is overseen by a large porcelain figure of Mao Tse Tung Photo by Paul Harris

It is a frenetic week for Asian auction enthusiasts – one of the busiest of the year. Staff from this website have aready attended Asian events at Chiswick Auctions (London) and Dreweatts & Bloomsbury (Newbury, Berkshire). Today, we are at Woolley & Wallis (Salisbury) and tomorrow we move on to Dukes in Dorchester!

We shall post a full report in a couple of days but, thus far, there is no evidence of a collapse in prices in  the Asian market. Quite the contrary. Good things continue to sell well thanks to telephone and internet.

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Viewing at Chiswick Auctions on Monday Photo Paul Harris

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Viewing at Dreweatts & Bloomsbury, Tuesday Photo Paul Harris

 

Some interesting lots feature in Dreweatts 2-day sale

Over the next ten days, with the Asian sale season not yet upon us, four English auction houses have some very mixed sales with Chinese lots cropping up randomly. As we have a penchant here for the curious and the unusual, these general sales (often termed ‘Interiors’) seem to turn up intriguing items which have somehow not made it into the specialist Asian sales. For the buyer, that can be good news as occasionally it cuts down on the competition! H0442-L88863219 Lot 238 at Dreweatts Four large Chinese porcelain figures of Lenin, Stalin and Mao (43-67cm. high) probably dating from the late 1950s or the 1960s. Estimate £4-600. We wrote a couple of days ago about Duke’s upcoming sale on February 18 and 19 (http://chineseart.co.uk/auctions/some-interesting-lots-seen-at-viewing-of-dukes-sale/). Also Gorringes in Sussex (www.gorringes.co.uk) have an Interiors Sale on February 23 with many Chinese lots, and Dreweatts at Donnington Priory have an Interiors Sale on February 23 and 24 which boasts over 100 Chinese lots on the 23rd. On the 24th, they are selling the contents of Cherkley Court, the former home of newspaper magnate Lord Beaverbrook. Cherkley is a late Victorian mansion near Leatherhead in Surrey, bult in 1893 in the French chateau-style. It was bought by Lord Beaverbrook in 1911 and was filled with antiques and miscellanea. There are a few Chinese items and several lots feature ‘lamped’ vases and stands. One of these seems interesting to us. Lot 319 is a very large Chinese yellow ground baluster vase, probably early 20th century. Standing at nearly 54cm. high, the honeycomb ground encloses flower heads reserved with panels of Taotie masks and Buddhistic lion masks, the shoulders decorated with wufu and shou medallions. It is an imposing piece and is estimated at £600-900. Cheap, if it falls within that price range. 319 Lot 319 at Dreweatts  Large and imposing lamped vase.

We have just been made aware that Hannam’s (Selborne, Hampshire) also have a Fine Antiques & Collectables sale on February 18/19 which features a large number of Chinese items (www.hannamsauctioneers.com).

Cranes fly high and tiger leaps at Dreweatts!

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 Cranes appeared to prove their legendary auspicious powers in an auction at Dreweatts Donnington Priory last week, when a pair of cloisonné enamel double crane censers flew beyond their pre-sale estimate, selling for £124,000 to a bidder on the phone. They had been estimated at £6-8,000! Earlier in the sale, a Warring States-Western Han style, bronze model of a tiger also made an equally impressive £64,480 against an estimate of £3-5,000.

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Early in the sale, Lot 8 offered was a Warring States-Western Han style, powerfully cast tiger, prowling forward with raised head, quasi-triangular ears, eyes alert and pug- nosed snout that enhances the visual effect of its wide open mouth, ferociously baring its teeth, in an aggressive attitude, inlaid with gold and silver designs of clouds, spirals, geometrical and fur-like patterns, all on a rich background of maroon-patinated bronze, the neck incised with two character inscription, 13.2cm long, with a19th century hardwood collector’s fitted box 仿战国西汉 错金银青铜石虎形. Dreweatt’s catalogue benefited from well referenced information on both the lots which scored high in the sale which was, surely, no coincidence.
‘TIGERS IN CHINESE ART  The tiger is one of the oldest and most revered animals in Chinese history. According to Han mythology, the tiger was one of the Four symbols for the cardinal points, representing the seven constellations of the west and the autumn season. In conjunction with the Green Dragon of the West, the Vermillion Bird of the South and the Black Tortoise of the North, the tiger positioned the burial within the spatial-temporal features of the universe.
‘In literature, the Queen Mother of the Western paradise, one of the most important deities of the Han Daoist pantheon, is described as having tiger’s teeth and tail. In burials, the deity sat on a throne decorated with a tiger and a dragon, the opposing yin-yang forces moving the universe, which the Queen Mother transcended.
Also underscoring auspicious symbolism for peace, tigers were associated with a successful reign, and were highly regarded as protectors and guardians for their power, strength and courage.
‘The character hu , 虎 , for tiger, is in fact homophone with hu , 护 , meaning protection, which must have clearly been sought to protect the tomb occupants against the malign influences they may encounter in their afterlife. In conjunction with other real and imaginary creatures, tigers also decorated the base of Han miniaturised mountainous landscape, a visual metaphor for the barriers of human morality that must be crossed whilst transitioning to immortality.
(..) Having transcended sacred mountains, one will gain supernatural powers, controlling the wind and rain, and finally reach to Heaven, the Abode of the Celestial Emperor,” mentioned the “Masters of Huainan”,Huainanzi , 淮南子 , a philosophical classic compiled in the second century BC, referring to the tortuous journey through a winding obstacle-laden landscape, which one must embark on, in search of the elixir of eternal life.
‘During the Han dynasty, the soul was expected to encounter many dangers on its journey to paradise, including malignant ghosts, spirits, and ferocious beasts. Mountains were highly praised in China for their high peaks, close connections with heaven, the ability to produce water, life-giving element, and their many cavities, where immortals were thought to inhabit. The Huainanzi , for instancerefers to the mountain as a Chilly Wind Peak climbed by people who achieved deathlessness and became gods.
‘Mountains were also conceptualised as treacherous realms for their inhabitants had unpredictable, supernatural, powers and were thus considered as potentially malignant. “If someone entered the mountain possessed of no magical arts, he will certainly suffer harm. Some will fall victim to acute diseases or be wounded by weapons (…) Sometimes the man will encounter tigers, wolves, and poisonous insects. One cannot enter the mountain lightly !” mentions the “Master embracing simplicity,”Baopuzi , 抱樸子 , compiled between the third and fourth century AD.
‘Clearly, in addition to serving as the gateways to the land of immortality, mountains were also considered as the borderlands through which the soul must pass after death. A comparable tiger was included in Eskenazi’s 1998 exhibition, published in Giuseppe Eskenazi, 1998, Animals and Animal Designs in Chinese Art , New York: catalogue no. 5, foldout cover of catalogue ; another example will be offered by Bonhams for sale in New York on 16th March 2015, estimated $200,00-300,000.
‘A pair of mat or “sleeve weights” cast in form of gold and silver inlaid tigers, were included in Christian Deydier’s exhibition at the XXVIII Biennale Des Antiquaries, Paris, September 2014, published in Christian Deydier, 2014, Ancient Chinese Bronzes , Paris, catalogue n. 9, p. 49. For additional references see Shawn Eichman, 2000, Taoism and the arts of China , Chicago, p. 129; Lukas Nickel, 2000, Some Han dynasty paintings in the British Museum , vol. 60, n. 1, p. 59-78; Wu Hung, 2010, The Art of the Yellow Springs, Understanding Chinese tombs, Honolulu. ‘

Within half an hour, the sale saw another remarkable result when Lot 27, a pair of cloisonné crane censers, came up for sale. They were catalogued as A pair of cloisonné enamel double crane censers, each group finely modelled as a large crane and young standing on an elaborate champlevé and cloisonné enamel rockwork- shaped pedestals interspersed with blooming flowers, standing on tall legs detailed with cylindrical bands, the smaller crane with one leg slightly bent, their long necks naturalistically curved, the taller crane grasping a double-peach sprig in its pointed beak, the bodies and feathers realistically detailed in black and white enamels within gilded borders, with the red crests wings covering the hollow body, 150cm high
本件拍品将以无年代出售,‘清’字样不予考虑

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Again, Dreweatts showed the advantage of real cataloguing as a result of diligent research, ‘Cranes are an important component of the Chinese decorative system which is based on the use of images whose auspicious symbolism was conveyed by their intrinsic qualities and the homophonic nature of the Chinese language. The underlying principle to such a system was the belief that all natural phenomena and things on Earth were an expression of Heaven’s will towards the human conduct. Auspicious events, therefore, were reproduced in writing or images in China and believed to function just like their physical counterpart and thus perpetuate their benign effects. In this way, buildings, tombs, gardens, paintings, ceramic, lacquer, metal wares and textiles were decorated with flowers, birds, animals and other auspicious symbols.
‘Cranes have a long-lived tradition of connection with immortality beliefs in China. As birds with a long life span, they were associated with longevity, immortality and wisdom, especially following the rise of Daoism from the Han dynasty. We may recall the flying cranes appearing on the domed ceiling of the tomb of Wang Chuzhi of the Five Dynasties and the high-ranking tombs of the Liao, and the frequent occurrence of cranes in relation to the miraculous rebirth as immortal beings in vernacular literature dating from the 12th century.
‘Cranes were also praised for their ability to dance to music and described in the Ruiying tu of the sixth century BC as gathering around the legendary Yellow Emperor as he practiced music on Kunlun mountains, accompanying scholars as they played music in Tang and Song paintings and appearing in official celebrations and gatherings. Accompanying the rites, music provided a moral and physical definition to a dynastic rule. In this context, therefore, cranes were interpreted as heavenly indicators of the emperor’s benevolence and sage governance. It may not be incidental that the word for crane is in fact homophone with the Chinese word for harmony he.
‘Cranes became even more closely related to a successful reign/emperor during the prosperous period of Northern Song Emperor Huizong (r. AD 1100-1126) as the search for auspicious images increased and the Xuanhe ruilan ce, comprising some thousand volumes recording auspicious sightings, was compiled. During this time, cranes appeared as pennants and employed as part of the imperial regalia that accompanied many official affairs on the court. Cranes also appeared in many Song court paintings. Cranes above Kaifeng, in particular, has been attributed to or commissioned by Emperor Huizong. The work depicts twenty cranes appearing in flight above the Golden Gate to the Imperial Palace on the 3rd day of the Lantern Festival – believed to be 26th February 1126) as if sent by Heaven to sanction and celebrate one of the most glorious days of Huizong’s reign when the court was at its highest splendour and the emperor was united with his subjects as they wished him longevity for the year to come.
It may therefore be little surprising that cranes were also ubiquitously found at the court of the Qing emperors, especially that of Qianlong (AD 1735-1795), emperor known for his virtuousness and appreciation of antiquity. In this instance, cranes not only appeared in paintings but even three-dimensionally as components of miniaturised immortal palaces made of jades, agate and other precious stones and in greater size flanking the imperial throne, such as the one presented here. Standing on an elaborate cloisonné stand, not only does this creature serve a highly visual appealing purpose, but in much the same way as the glorious emperors of the past, was surely employed by the Imperial House of the Qing as a powerful symbol embodying the contemporary brilliance of the Chinese Empire.
‘For the occurrence of cranes in the arts of the Qing dynasty see Pine, plum and cranes painted by Shen Quan (AD 1682-1760), Cranes against Sky and Waters by Yu Xing (AD 1692-after 1767), and the miniature landscape representing the immortal island of Penglai in gold, pearls and precious stones, all part of the Imperial Collection at the Palace Museum in Beijing and illustrated in the Royal Academy catalogue China. The Three Emperors 1662-1795, 2005, figs 268-269.
For an account on the interpretation of auspicious images see Jessica Rawson, The power of images: the model universe of the First Emperor and its legacy, in Historical Research 75, May 2002, p.123-154 and The Auspicious Universe, by the same author, in China. The Three Emperors 1662-1795, Royal Academy, 2005, p. 270-305.
For an account on the interpretation of cranes at the court of Huizong see Peter Sturman, Cranes above Kaifeng: The Auspicious Image at the Court of Huizong, in Ars Orientalis, 1990, p. 33-68.
For the occurrence of cranes during the Han dynasty see Anna Seidel, Post-Mortem Immortality or The Taoist Resurrection of the Body, 1987.’

 

 

Dreweatts sale reminds us of the role of the crane in Chinese art

465845-13  A fine looking pair of very large crane censers come up at Dreweatts & Bloomsbury’s Asian Sale at Donnington Priory on May 19. The auctioneers have catalogued these items particularly well and are, rather modestly, estimating them at £6-8,000. They seem sure to do rather better than that.

‘A pair of cloisonné enamel double crane censers, each group finely modelled as a large crane and young standing on an elaborate champlevé and cloisonné enamel rockwork- shaped pedestals interspersed with blooming flowers, standing on tall legs detailed with cylindrical bands, the smaller crane with one leg slightly bent, their long necks naturalistically curved, the taller crane grasping a double-peach sprig in its pointed beak, the bodies and feathers realistically detailed in black and white enamels within gilded borders, with the red crests wings covering the hollow body, 150cm high 清 御制掐丝珐琅双鹤香炉一对 成交价

Cranes are an important component of the Chinese decorative system which is based on the use of images whose auspicious symbolism was conveyed by their intrinsic qualities and the homophonic nature of the Chinese language. The underlying principle to such a system was the belief that all natural phenomena and things on Earth were an expression of Heaven’s will towards the human conduct. Auspicious events, therefore, were reproduced in writing or images in China and believed to function just like their physical counterpart and thus perpetuate their benign effects. In this way, buildings, tombs, gardens, paintings, ceramic, lacquer, metal wares and textiles were decorated with flowers, birds, animals and other auspicious symbols.

Cranes have a long-lived tradition of connection with immortality beliefs in China. As birds with a long life span, they were associated with longevity, immortality and wisdom, especially following the rise of Daoism from the Han dynasty. We may recall the flying cranes appearing on the domed ceiling of the tomb of Wang Chuzhi of the Five Dynasties and the high-ranking tombs of the Liao, and the frequent occurrence of cranes in relation to the miraculous rebirth as immortal beings in vernacular literature dating from the 12th century.

Cranes were also praised for their ability to dance to music and described in the Ruiying tu of the sixth century BC as gathering around the legendary Yellow Emperor as he practiced music on Kunlun mountains, accompanying scholars as they played music in Tang and Song paintings and appearing in official celebrations and gatherings. Accompanying the rites, music provided a moral and physical definition to a dynastic rule. In this context, therefore, cranes were interpreted as heavenly indicators of the emperor’s benevolence and sage governance.

It may not be incidental that the word for crane is in fact homophone with the Chinese word for harmony he. Cranes became even more closely related to a successful reign/emperor during the prosperous period of Northern Song Emperor Huizong (r. AD 1100-1126) as the search for auspicious images increased and the Xuanhe ruilan ce, comprising some thousand volumes recording auspicious sightings, was compiled. During this time, cranes appeared as pennants and employed as part of the imperial regalia that accompanied many official affairs on the court.

Cranes also appeared in many Song court paintings. Cranes above Kaifeng, in particular, has been attributed to or commissioned by Emperor Huizong. The work depicts twenty cranes appearing in flight above the Golden Gate to the Imperial Palace on the 3rd day of the Lantern Festival – believed to be 26th February 1126) as if sent by Heaven to sanction and celebrate one of the most glorious days of Huizong’s reign when the court was at its highest splendour and the emperor was united with his subjects as they wished him longevity for the year to come.

It may therefore be little surprising that cranes were also ubiquitously found at the court of the Qing emperors, especially that of Qianlong (AD 1735-1795), emperor known for his virtuousness and appreciation of antiquity. In this instance, cranes not only appeared in paintings but even three-dimensionally as components of miniaturised immortal palaces made of jades, agate and other precious stones and in greater size flanking the imperial throne, such as the one presented here. Standing on an elaborate cloisonné stand, not only does this creature serve a highly visual appealing purpose, but in much the same way as the glorious emperors of the past, was surely employed by the Imperial House of the Qing as a powerful symbol embodying the contemporary brilliance of the Chinese Empire.

For the occurrence of cranes in the arts of the Qing dynasty see Pine, plum and cranes painted by Shen Quan (AD 1682-1760), Cranes against Sky and Waters by Yu Xing (AD 1692-after 1767), and the miniature landscape representing the immortal island of Penglai in gold, pearls and precious stones, all part of the Imperial Collection at the Palace Museum in Beijing and illustrated in the Royal Academy catalogue China. The Three Emperors 1662-1795, 2005, figs 268-269. For an account on the interpretation of auspicious images see Jessica Rawson, The power of images: the model universe of the First Emperor and its legacy, in Historical Research 75, May 2002, p.123-154 and The Auspicious Universe, by the same author, in China. The Three Emperors 1662-1795, Royal Academy, 2005, p. 270-305. For an account on the interpretation of cranes at the court of Huizong see Peter Sturman, Cranes above Kaifeng: The Auspicious Image at the Court of Huizong, in Ars Orientalis, 1990, p. 33-68. For the occurrence of cranes during the Han dynasty see Anna Seidel, Post-Mortem Immortality or The Taoist Resurrection of the Body, 1987.’

There is said to be slight wear to the cloisonne enamels and gilding but otherwise they are in good condition. They seem bound to occasion substantial interest.

Chinese silver sparkles at Dreweatts & Bloomsbury

Thirteen lots of Chinese silver were sold on February 26 by Dreweatts and Bloomsbury Auctions at their Donnington Priory Saleroom (see our pre-sale article). The best pieces comfortably exceeded pre-sale estimates.

Lot 801, the 18th century pair of Quianlong filigree vases and covers, estimated at £3,000-4,000, achieved a highly satisfactory £23,560, inclusive of premium, and Lot 800, a smaller version, pulled in £21,080 (estimate £2,000-3,000).

dreweatts1 Lot 801

Deputy-Chairman James Nicholson professed himself ‘highly delighted’ with the result. Well known silver expert Adrien von Ferscht has just joined the company as Consultant in Chinese Export Silver to maximise on the opportunities in the area currently presented.

Important Chinese silver to be sold

In their next silver sale at Donnington Priory on February 26, auctioneers Dreweatts and Bloomsbury feature two particularly important Chinese lots: a pair of export silver filigree vases and covers, and an unusual pair of Chinese export silver models of Huabiao ceremonial columns.

dreweatts1

The vases, ascribed to the Quianlong period, do not carry any markings but, according to silver expert Adrien von Ferscht in his article The Art of Filigree, the best Chinese filigree was produced during the 18th century and most pieces do not carry a maker’s mark, in the way later 19th century pieces do. [The technique of filigree originated in Spain and was practised by Jewish Sephardi silversmiths who too it with them when they were expelled by the Moorish invasion in 1492].

During the 17th and 18th centuries filigree silver was produced throughout Asia where it was highly prized. Many export pieces were purchased for the collections of the first major European museums and affluent, often aristocratic, owners. Pieces similarly worked to those in the sale are illustrated in Silver Wonders from the East: Filigree of the Tsars, the catalogue for the 2006 exhibition at the Hermitage Amsterdam.

The 20cm. tall pair in the sale are estimated at £3,000-4,000. There is also a second, octagonal, pair in the sale estimated at £2,000-3,000. dreweatts2

A pair of striking 29.5cm. high export silver models of Chinese Huabiao ceremonial columns by Bao Xiang, Beijing, carry the three hallmarks of Zu Yin, Bao Xiang and Bei Jing. They were crafted around 1890 and depict a dragon amidst clouds above waves in semi-relief and a cloud board on a hexagonal waisted plinth. The square base is enclosed by a pierced balustrade and shows dragons confronting a flaming pearl to the lower panels. The pair are estimated at a modest £1,500-2,000.

There are thirteen Chinese silver lots in the sale.

Asian art auctions – UK Nationwide January-December 2017

Featured

SONY DSC                                                                                                   Photo by Paul Harris

January 21 Semleys, Shaftesbury Art & Antiques (incl. Asian) www.semleyauctioneers.com

January 25 John Nicholson’s Auctions, Fernhurst Fine Oriental Works of Art

January 25-6 Hannams, Selborne Fine Art & Antiques (incl. Asian) www.hannamsauctioneers.com

January 26 Capes Dunn, Manchester Decorative Art, European & Oriental Ceramics & Glass www.capesdunn.com

January 26 McTears, Glasgow Asian Works of Art www.mctears.co.uk

February 21 Dreweatts, Newbury Interiors (incl. 60 Asian lots) www.dreweatts.com

February 23 Duke’s, Dorchester Ceramics, Glass & Furniture (includes 234 Asian lots) www.dukes-auctions.com

February 23-4 Hannams, Selborne Fine Art & Antiques (incl. Asian) www.hannamsauctioneers.com

February 28 Chiswick Auctions Asian Art www.chiswickauctions.co.uk

March 1 Adam Partridge, Liverpool Antiques & Collectors’ Items with Oriental & Asian Works of Art www.adampartridge.co.uk

March 22 Bonhams, Edinburgh Asian Art www.bonhams.com

March 22 Lyon and Turnbull, Edinburgh Asian Works of Art www.lyonandturnbull.com

March 30-31 Hannams, Selborne Fine Art & Antiques (incl. Asian) www.hannamsauctioneers.com

April 19 Capes Dunn, Manchester European & Oriental Ceramics, Glass and Ivories www.capesdunn.com

April 20 Tooveys, Sussex Asian & Islamic Ceramics & Works of Art www.tooveys.com

April 26  Mallams, Cheltenham Chinese Art www.mallams.co.uk

April 26 John Nicholson’s Asian Art Collection from the Estate of Maurice Collis www.johnnicholsons.com

May 5 Hannams, Selborne Two Day Sale including 500 lots of Asian Art www.hannamsauctioneers.com

May 8 Bonhams, London Knightsbridge Asian Art www.bonhams.com

May 9 Sworders, Mountfitchet Asian Art www.sworder.co.uk

May 9  Lyon & Turnbull in London Scholars’ Rocks: Fine Asian Works of Art www.lyonandturnbull.com

May 10 Sotheby’s London Asian Art www.sothebys.com

May 11 Eastbourne Auctions Oriental Ceramics (part of 3 day sale) www.eastbourneauction.com

May 12 Christies South Kensington Asian Art www.christies.com

May 13 Coldingham Borders Auctions, Berwickshire Art, Antiques & Collectables including Asian www.coldinghambordersauctions.co.uk

May 13 Clarkes Auctions, Semley General Sale with Asian www.clarkesauctions.co.uk

May 13 Semleys, Wiltshire Asian Sale http://www.semleyauctioneers.com

May 15 Chiswick Auctions Asian Art www.chiswickauctions.co.uk

May 16 Dreweatts & Bloomsbury, Newbury Asian Art www.dreweatts.com

May 16-17 Woolley & Wallis, Salisbury Asian Art www.woolleyandwallis.co.uk

May 18 Dukes of Dorchester Asian Art www.dukes-auctions.com

May 18 Ewbanks, Surrey Asian Sale www.ewbankauctions.co.uk

May 24 25 Blythe Road, London European & Asian Art www.25blytheroad.com

June 27 Roseberys, London Asian Art www.roseberys.co.uk

June 28 Capes Dunn, Manchester European & Oriental Ceramics, Glass and Ivories www.capesdunn.com

July 12 Bonhams, Edinburgh Asian Art www.bonhams.com

August 24 McTears, Glasgow Asian Works of Art www.mctears.co.uk

August 24 Hannams, Selborne Asian Art (part of general antiques sale) http://www.hannamsauctioneers.com

September 13 Lyon & Turnbull, Edinburgh Asian Art www.lyonandturnbull.com

September 14 Dukes of Dorchester Ceramics, Asian Art, etc.www.dukes-auctions.com

October 25 Mallams, Cheltenham Chinese Art (part of 2-day Asian sale) www.mallams.co.uk

November 6-7 Bonhams London Asian Art www.bonhams.com

November 8 Lyon & Turnbull, London Asian Works of Art www.lyonandturnbull.com

November 9 Bonhams, London Fine Chinese Art www.bonhams.com

November 13 Chiswick Auctions Asian Art www.chiswickauctions.co.uk

November 14 Chiswick Auctions Fine Chinese Paintings www.chiswickauctions.co.uk

November 14 Woolley & Wallis, Salisbury Asian Art http://www.woolleyandwallis.co.uk

November 14 Dreweatts & Bloomsbury, Newbury Asian Art www.dreweatts.com

November 16 Dukes of Dorchester Asian Art www.dukes-auctions.com

November 16  McTears, Glasgow Asian Works of Art mctears.co.uk

December 5 Bonhams, Edinburgh Asian Art www.bonhams.com

 

January – November 2016 Diary Dates January 12  McTears, Glasgow Asian Works of Art  www.mctears.co.uk January 20 Bearnes, Hampton, Littlewood, Exeter Oriental & European Ceramics & Glass www.bhandl.co.uk January 22/3  John Nicholsons, Fernhurst Oriental & Fine Antiques www.johnnicholsons.com January 24 Semley Auctioneers, Shaftesbury Oriental & Islamic Ceramics & Works of Art www.semleyauctioneers.com January 26  Capes Dunn, Heaton Mersey, Cheshire European & Oriental Ceramics & Glass www.capesdunn.com January 27 Hannam’s, Selborne Oriental Works of Art www.hannamsauctioneers.com February 18-19 Dukes of Dorchester An Important European Private Collection, Ceramics, Asian Art & Furniture www.dukes-auctions.com February 18-19 Hannam’s, Selborne Fine Antiques & Collectables  A general sale but with more than 200 Chinese lots www.hannamsauctioneers.com February 19 John Nicholsons, Fernhurst Oriental Sale www.johnnicholsons.com February 23-4 Dreweatts Donnington Priory Interiors Includes more than 100 Chinese lots www.dreweatts.com February 23 Chiswick Auctions, London Asian Art www.chiswickauctions.co.uk February 23 Gorringes Interiors & Art Many Chinese lots www.gorringes.co.uk February 25 Tooveys, West Sussex Asian & Islamic Ceramics & Works of Art www.tooveys.com March 18 John Nicholsons, Fernhurst Oriental Sale www.johnnicholsons.com March 22 Lyon & Turnbull at Edinburgh rooms Fine Asian Works of Art www.lyonand turnbull.com March 23  Bonhams, Edinburgh Asian Art www.bonhams.com April 7  Cheffins, Cambridge Oriental Sale www.cheffins.co.uk April 21 Tooveys, West Sussex Asian & Islamic Ceramics & Works of Art www.tooveys.com April 27 John Nicholson’s Haslemere Oriental Sale www.johnnicholsons.com April 27/8 Mallams, Cheltenham Chinese, Indian, Islamic and Japanese art www.mallams.co.uk April 28/9 Hannams, Selborne Asian Art www.hannamsauctioneers.com

May 9 Bonhams Knightsbridge, London Asian Art www.bonhams.com

May 10  Sworders, Stansted Asian Art www.sworder.co.uk

May 10 Christie’s King Street Chinese Art www.christies.com

May 11 Sotheby’s New Bond St London Chinese Art www.sothebys.com

May 11 Halls, Kidderminster Shropshire Asian Sale www.hallsgb.com

May 12 Bonhams New Bond St London Fine Chinese Art www.bonhams.com

May 11/13 Christie’s South Kensington Ceramics, Works of Art & Textiles www.christies.com

May 14 Railtons Wooler Northumberland Antiques Sale features 52 Chinese lots www,jimrailton.com

May 14 Semley Auctioneers, Shaftesbury Asian Art www.semleyauctioneers.com

May 16 Chiswick Auctions, London Asian Art www.chiswickauctions.co.uk

May 17 Dreweatts & Bloomsbury Chinese Ceramics & Asian Works of Art www.dreweatts.com

May 17/18 Woolley & Wallis, Salisbury Asian Art www.woolleyandwallis.co.uk

May 20 Duke’s Auctioneers, Dorchester Asian Art www.dukes-auctions.com

May 24 25 Blythe Road Auctions, London European & Asian Works of Art www.25blytheroad.com

May 25  Gorringes, Lewes Asian Art www.gorringes.co.uk

May 25 Chorleys, Gloucester Asian Works of Art www.chorleys.com

May 31 McTears, Glasgow Asian Sale www.mctears.co.uk

June 21 Lyon & Turnbull at Crosshall Manor, Cambs. Fine Asian Art www.lyonand turnbull.com

June 21 Bonhams Knightsbridge Home & Interiors including Asian Art (144 lots) www.bonhams.com

June 29 John Nicholson’s, Haslemere Oriental Auction www.johnnicholsons.com

June 29 Roseberys London Asia: the art of symbolism www.roseberys.co.uk

June 30 Dreweatts, Donnington Priory Interiors (48 Asian lots) www.dreweatts.com

July 13 Bonhams, Edinburgh Asian Art www.bonhams.com

August 9 McTears, Glasgow Asian Sale www.mctears.co.uk

August 11 Cheffins, Cambridge Oriental Sale www.cheffins.co.uk

August 23 Dreweatts, Donnington Priory Interiors (to include Oriental section) www.dreweatts.com

August 25 Hannams, Selborne Fine Antiques & Oriental Works of Art www.hannams.auctioneers.com

September 2 John Nicholson’s Fine Oriental Works of Art www.johnnicholsons.com

September 6 Chiswick Auctions Asian Art www.chiswickauctions.co.uk

September 14 Plymouth Auction Rooms Chinese Ceramics & Works of Art www.plymouthauctions.co.uk

September 28-30 Bamfords, Derby Fine Art & Antique Sale (includes 200 lots of Asian art) www.bamfords-auctions.co.uk

Sdeptember 29-30 Hannams, Selborne Fine European & Oriental Works of Art (400 Oriental lots) www.hannamsauctioneers.com

October  6 Tooveys Asian & Islamic Ceramics & Works of Art www.tooveys.com

October 25 Dreweatts Castle Donnington Interiors (120 Asian lots) www.dreweatts.com

October 26 & 27 Mallams, Cheltenham Chinese, Japanese, Indian & Islamic Art www.mallams.co.uk

November 1 Capes Dunn, Manchester European & Oriental Ceramics, Glass & Ivories www.capesdunn.com

November 2 Bellmans, Winchester Asian Art www.bellmans.co.uk

November 3 Adam Partridge, Cheshire Asian Art www.adampartridge.co.uk

November 3 Hannams, Selborne Oriental & European Works of Art www.hannamsauctioneers.com

November 4 McTears Glasgow Asian Works of Art www.mctears.co.uk

November 5 Andrew Smith & Son, Winchester Asian Ceramics & Works of Art www.andrewsmithandson.com

November 7 Bonhams Knightsbridge, London Asian Art www.bonhams.com

November 8 Lyon & Turnbull in London at Asia House Fine Works of Asian Art www.lyonandturnbull.com

November 9 Christies South Kensington Chinese Ceramics, Art & Textiles www.christies.com

November 9 Sothebys London Chinese Art www.sothebys.com

November 9 Gorringes, Lewes Asian Art www.gorringes.co.uk

November 9 Halls, Shrewsbury Asian Art www.hallsgb.com/fineart

November 10 Bonhams New Bond Street, Fine Chinese Art www.bonhams.com

November 10 Ewbanks Asian & Eastern Art www.ewbankauctions.co.uk

November 10 Thomson Roddick Scottish Auctions Antiques including Asian & Oriental Works of Art www.trscottishauctions.com

November 11-12 John Nicholson’s, Surrey Asian incl. Max Lowenson Collection (November 11) www.johnnicholsons.com

November 12 Semley Auctioneers Oriental & Islamic Ceramics www.semleyauctioneers.com

November 14 Chiswick Auctions London Asian Art www.chiswickauctions.co.uk

November 14 Kidson Trigg Oriental Auction www.kidsontrigg.co.uk/auction

November 15 Bonhams Knightsbridge Home & Interiors including Asian Art www.bonhams.com

November 15 Dreweatts & Bloomsbury Castle Donnington Chinese Ceramics & Asian Works of Art www.dnfa.com

November 15/16 Woolley & Wallis, Salisbury Asian Art www.woolleyandwallis.co.uk

November 16 Bonhams, Edinburgh Asian Art www.bonhams.com

November 17 Cheffins, Cambridge Oriental Sale www.cheffins.co.uk

November 18 Dukes, Dorchester Asian Art www.dukes.com

November 23 Matthew Barton at 25 Blythe Road, London Asian Works of Art www.matthewbartonltd.com

November 24 Stride & Son, Chichester Oriental Ceramics & Works of Art www.stridesauctions.co.uk

November 25 Thomson, Roddick & Medcalf, Edinburgh Antiques including Oriental Art www.thomsonroddick.com

November 29 Sworders, Stansted Asian Art www.sworder.co.uk    

December 1 Toovey’s Asian & Islamic Ceramics & Works of Art www.tooveys.com

December 7 Roseberys London Asian Art www.roseberys.co.uk

December 7 Dreweatts & Bloomsbury London Oriental Manuscripts & Miniatures www.bloomsburyauctions.com

December 9 McTears Glasgow Asian Works of Art www.mctears.co.uk

December 13 Dreweatts & Bloomsbury Castle Donnington Asian Ceramics, Furniture & Works of Art www.dnfa.com

 

 

PAST June to December 2015 Diary Dates July 7 McTears, Glasgow Asian Works of Art www.mctears.co.uk July 8 Bonhams Edinburgh Asian Art www.bonhams.com July 14 Bonhams, Oxford British & European Ceramics, Glass and Asian Art www.bonhams.com July 30 Dukes of Dorchester Ceramics, Asian Art & Furniture www.dukes-auctions.com September 1 Chiswick Auctions, London Asian Art www.chiswickauctions.co.uk September 15 McTears, Glasgow Asian Works of Art www.mctears.co.uk September 23 Bonhams Knightsbridge Asian Art www.bonhams.com October 21 Mallams, Cheltenham Asian & Islamic Art www.mallams.co.uk October 30 Hannams, Selborne, Hants Fine Oriental Art www.hannamsauctioneers.com November 3 Capes Dunn, Manchester Oriental & European Ceramics & Glassware www.capesdunn.com November 5 Ewbanks, Send, Surrey Asian & Eastern Art www.ewbankauctions.co.uk November 5-6 John Nicholson’s Oriental Auction www.johnnicholsons.com November 9 Bonhams Knightsbridge Asian Art www.bonhams.com November 10 Sworders Mountffitchet, Stansted Asian Art www.sworder.co.uk November 10 Christie’s King Street, London Fine Chinese Ceramics & Works of Art www.christies.com November 11 Christie’s South Kensington, London Chinese Ceramics & Works of Art www.christies.com November 11 Sothebys London Classical Chinese Furniture from a European Private Collection www.sothebys.com November 11 Sothebys London Important Chinese Art www.sothebys.com November 11 Halls, Kidderminster Asian Art www.hallsgb.com November 12 Dukes of Dorchester Asian Art www.dukes-auctions.com November 12 Bonhams, London New Bond Street Fine Chinese Art www.bonhams.com November 12 Cheffins, Cambridge The Oriental Sale www.cheffins.co.uk November 13 Christie’s South Kensington Chinese Ceramics & Works of Art www.christies.com November 16 Dreweatts Chinese Ceramics & Asian Works of Art www.dreweatts.com November 16 Sworders Asian Art www.sworder.co.uk November 16 The Swan at Tetsworth Asian Art www.theswan.co.uk November 17 McTears, Glasgow Asian Works of Art www.mctears.com November 17/18 Woolley & Wallis, Salisbury Asian Art www.woolleyandwallis.co.uk November 18 Bonhams, Edinburgh Asian Art www.bonhams.com November 18 Peter Francis Auctioneers, Carmarthen Antiques & Fine Art To include Chinese ceramics www.peterfrancis.co.uk November 25-26 Mellors & Kirk Fine Art Sale Includes Asian Art www.mellorsandkirk.com December 1 Lyon & Turnbull (Edinburgh) at Crosshall Manor, Cambridgeshire Fine Asian Works of Art www.lyonandturnbull.co.uk December 9 Dreweatts Donnington Priory, Newbury Pictures, Asian & European Ceramics, Furniture and Works of Art www.dreweatts.com December 11 Hannams, Selborne, Hants Fine European & Oriental Works of Art www.hannamsauctioneers.com   January to June 2015 Diary Dates January 6 Dreweatts & Bloomsbury, Newbury, Berks Pictures, Ceramics & Asian Works of Art www.dreweatts.com January 20 Capes Dunn & Co., Manchester European & Oriental Ceramics, Works of Art and Glass www.capesdunn.com January 21 John Nicholson’s, Haslemere, Surrey Oriental Sale www.johnnicholsons.com January 23 Hannam’s, Selborne Fine Oriental & European Works of Art www.hannamsauctioneers.com January 24 Semley Auctioneers, Shaftesbury, Dorset Oriental & Islamic Ceramics and Works of Art (part sale) www.semleyauctioneers.com February 10 Chiswick Auctions, London Asian Art www.chiswickauctions.co.uk February 17 McTears, Glasgow Asian Works of Art www.mctears.co.uk February 19-20 Duke’s, Dorchester Ceramics, Asian Art and Furniture www.dukes-auctions.com Part Asian sale February 25 Gorringes, Lewes Fine Art, Antiques & Collactables (160 Chinese lots in a large 2-day general sale) www.gorringes.co.uk February 25 Bonhams, Knightsbridge Asian Art www.bonhams.com February 26 Dominic Winter, Cirencester Oriental Ceramics & Jade, Tribal & Sailor art, Silver, Jewellery & Furniture Part Asian sale www.dominicwinter.co.uk February 26 Tooveys, West Sussex Asian Art www.tooveys.com March 4-5 John Nicholson’s, Haslemere Oriental Two-Day Sale www.johnnicholsons.com March 6 Hannam’s, Selborne Fine Oriental & European Works of Art  www.hannamsauctioneers.com March 25 Bonhams, Edinburgh Asian Art  www.bonhams.com/locations/EDI/ March 26 Cheffins, Cambridge Oriental Sale www.cheffins.co.uk April 23 Tooveys, West Sussex Asian Art www.tooveys.com April 30 Mallams, Cheltenham Asian, Oriental & Islamic Works of Art www.mallams.co.uk May 5 2015 Chiswick Auctions, London Asian Art www.chiswickauctions.co.uk May 15 Dukes of Dorchester, Asian Art www.dukes-auctions.com May 19 Sworders, Stansted Mountfitchet Asian Art www.sworder.co.uk May 20/21 Woolley & Wallis, Salisbury Asian Art www.woolleyandwallis.co.uk May 29 Adam Partridge, Macclesfield Asian Works of Art & Musical Instruments An interesting combination sale   www.adampartridge.co.uk June 5 Hannams, Selborne, Hants Fine European & Oriental Works of Art  www.hannamsauctioneers.com June 10 John Nicholson’s, Haslemere Oriental Auction www.johnnicholsons.com June 15/16   Lyon & Turnbull, Crosshall Manor, St Neots, Cambridgeshire Asian Sale www.lyonandturnbull.com June 24 Gorringes, Lewes, Sussex Fine Art, Antiques & Collectables (including more than 300 lots of Asian art, mainly Chinese) www.gorringes.com   Past Auctions 2014 Winter-Spring 2014 January 21 Kidson-Trigg Auctioneers, Swindon, Wiltshire  Specialist Oriental and Silver, Jewellery, Objets d’Art & Collectables February 5 Gorringes, Lewes, Sussex  Fine Art, Antiques & Collectables (includes more than 100 Chinese lots) February 13 Lyon & Turnbull, Edinburgh Asian Art February 19 Bonhams, London Knightsbridge Asian Art February 19-20 John Nicholson Auctioneers, Haslemere, Surrey Oriental Sale February 27  Tooveys, Worthing, Sussex Asian and Islamic Ceramics and Works of Art February 28 Dreweatts & Bloomsbury, Donnington Priory Silver (not a Chinese specific sale but there are 13 Lots of Chinese silver) March 4 McTears Glasgow Asian Art March 7 British Bespoke Auctions, Winchcombe, Glos., Oriental Sale March 8 Paul Beighton Auctioneers, Rotherham Antique, Fine Art & Decorative (approx. 170 Asian lots) March 12 Dreweatts & Bloomsbury, Donnington Priory Interiors and Asian Works of Art March 20 Thomson Roddick, Edinburgh Antiques and Oriental and Asian Works of Art (includes approx. 100 Asian items) March 26 Bonhams, Edinburgh Asian Art March 27 Cheffins, Cambridge Oriental Sale April 2 John Nicholson’s, Haslemere, Surrey Oriental Sale April 15 Kidson-Trigg Auctioneers, Swindon, Wiltshire Oriental Sale April 24  Tooveys, Worthing, Sussex Oriental Sale April 29 Sworders, Stansted Mountfitchet Asian Art April 30 Mallams, Cheltenham Asian, Oriental & Islamic Art May 12 Bonhams London, Knightsbridge Asian Art May 13 Christie’s, King Street London Fine Chinese Ceramics & Works of Art and The C Philip Cardeiro Collection of Chinese Art May 13 Mctears, Glasgow Asian Works of Art May 14 Dreweatts & Bloomsbury, Donnington Priory Chinese Ceramics & Asian Works of Art May 15 Bonhams London, New Bond Street, Fine Chinese Art May 16 Christie’s South Kensington, Chinese May 21/22 Woolley & Wallis, Salisbury, Wiltshire  Specialist Chinese & Japanese Works of Art May 22/23 Chorleys, Gloucester Asian Sale May 29 Ewbank’s, Send, Surrey, Chinese, Japanese, and Eastern Works of Art, Ceramics, Costumes & Textiles May 31 Paul Beighton Auctioneers, Rotherham Antique Furniture, Fine Art & Decorative Objects A general 2-day sale with some 114 lots of Chinese interest on Day 1     June-December 2014 Diary Dates June 4 Lyon & Turnbull, Edinburgh Asian Art June 12 Thomson Roddick, Edinburgh Antiques & Works of Art Includes Oriental section June 19  Tooveys, Worthing, Sussex  Oriental Sale July 2 Bonhams, Edinburgh Asian Art July 2 John Nicholson Auctioneers, Haslemere Oriental Art July 15 Kidson-Trigg, Swindon Specialist Oriental Sale July 22 Mctears, Glasgow Asian Works of Art August 14  Tooveys, Worthing, Sussex  Oriental Sale September 3 Crow’s Art Gallery, Dorking Asian & Islamic Art September 11 Bonhams London, Knightsbridge Asian Art September 5 Hannam’s, Selborne, Hants. Fine Oriental & European Works of Ar September 30 Mctears, Glasgow Asian Works of Art October 8 Dreweatts & Bloomsbury, Newbury Asian Art, Paintings, Prints, Ceramics & Clocks October 9 Cheffins, Cambridge Oriental Sale October 14 Kidson-Trigg, Swindon Specialist Oriental Sale October 14 High Road Auctions, Chiswick Antiques, Fine Art & Collectables, to include a private collection of Chinese Works of Art October 14 Capes Dunn & Co, Manchester European & Oriental Ceramics, Works of Art & Glass October 22 Mallams, Cheltenham Asian, Oriental & Islamic Asian Art in London Series November 3 Bonhams London, Knightsbridge Asian Art November 4 Christie’s, South Kensington London Chinese Ceramics & Works of Art November 5 Sotheby’s London, New Bond Street Fine Chinese Ceramics & Works of Art November 5 Halls Fine Art, Battllefield, Shrewsbury Asian Art Sale November 5-6 Brightwells, Leominster Autumn Two Day Fine Art Sale includes The Julia Gibbons Chinese Art Collection (57 items) November 6 Bonhams, London New Bond Street Fine Chinese Art, The Roy Davids Collection of Chinese Ceramics November 7 Christie’s South Kensington, London Chinese Ceramics, Works of Art & Textiles   November 7 The Cheshire Saleroom, Macclesfield Chinese, Japanese & Eastern Works of Art November 10 Dreweatts & Bloomsbury Auctions Chinese Ceramics and Asian Works of Art November 11 Sworders, Stansted Mountfitchet Asian Art November 11 Kidson-Trigg, Swindon Specialist Oriental Sale November 12/13 Woolley & Wallis, Salisbury Asian Art November 14 Dukes, Dorchester Asian Art November 19 Bonhams, Edinburgh Asian Art December 2 Lyon & Turnbull, Edinburgh Fine Asian Works of Art To be held at Crosshall Manor, St Neots December 3 Hansons Auctioneers, Etwall, Derbyshire Winter Fine Art Sale to include approx. 50 pieces of Chinese jade from Masalski collection December 4 Tooveys, Worthing, Sussex Asian & Islamic Ceramics and Works of Art December 9 Mctears Glasgow, Asian Works of Art December 10/11 John Nicholson’s, Haslemere Two Day Oriental Sale December 18 Wellers, Chertsey, Surrey Silver and Oriental Auction