The Ivory Ban Express thunders down the track

opinion hl

It’s coming for sure. But collectors and dealers can only guess how long they have before the ivory ban express, currently thundering down the track, hits them, pretty much full on. The shape of the impact is being heavily leaked by an organisation operating under the acronym BAMF (The British Art Market Federation). You might not be acquainted with this none too illustrious organisation but, like it or not, BAMF (representative of several, but not all, art and antique trade organisations) has somehow emerged as the exclusive negotiator in a process which has apparently attracted more than 60,000 representations from the trade and the general public.

dreweatts chinese ivory coffee pot Museum quality? Probably

We are told that what BAMF is recommending to the government will probably be what we get in the end of the day. And it will mean the end for most dealers selling ivory antiquities.  What are we looking at? Only a very small percentage of those pre-1947 ivory antiquities currently on the market will be able to be sold once the ban comes into force. In the not too distant future, they will be required to fit into very specific categories, viz. they will either be pieces in which ivory comprises a very small part (the so-called de minimis rule); or they will require to be items of artistic, cultural or historic merit based upon the criteria of so-called ‘museum quality. Items which fit into these categories would be licensed at a suggested fee of at least £50, plus VAT no doubt.

SONY DSC  Museum quality? Probably not, but attractive just the same. Nevertheless, it’s the knacker’s yard for pieces like this . . . 

China Ivory Destruction

The sort of attractive, well carved 18th or 19th century items which constitute the main part of the trade today will not qualify for sale, although there may well be bitter argument over individual items. That begs the question as to who will be sitting in judgment? Well, surprise, surprise that might well be a committee set up of the great and the good by the aforementioned BAMF. Doubtless there will be many top flight dealers pushing themselves forward. They might, of course, be the same people, or type of people, who are wealthy and influential enough to own and trade in those ‘museum quality’ items. However, items like the ones below (the relatively common ‘Doctors’ Figures’) are not quite their sort of thing and, despite their historical interest, they will disappear from circulation.

doctor figure

As is so usual these days in all walks of life, those at the top of the tree will be virtually unaffected by the new legislation. They will prosper as ever. It is the smaller dealer who will bear all the cost of this ban, most of whose stock will have been painstakingly (and expensively) accumulated over many years when there was no suggestion that their right to trade might suddenly disappear virtually overnight. It is the smaller trader’s stock which will become unsalable if it cannot be proved to be of ‘museum quality’.

What is to be done then with these tens of thousands of pieces of carved ivory? It may, of course, be possible to write off their original purchase cost as a tax loss. The catch there is that Her Majesty’s Revenue & Customs will almost certainly require the destruction of the pieces. Another option might be to swamp the Committee of the Great & The Good with applications for thousands of pieces to be recognised as being of ‘museum quality’. The downside there might be that pieces not accorded such special status would also be destroyed By Order of said committee, in much the same way as in France paintings adjudicated upon by the estates of well known artists as being copies or forgeries are routinely destroyed.

The supreme irony is that the expected legislation will not only fail to save the threatened elephant population but will actually bring its demise rather nearer. What very few people appear to have taken into account is the fact that an almost complete ban here on trade in the UK will not dent in any way the appetite in the Far East for processed ivory. That will continue unabated. At least the legitimate trade in historic pieces in the UK has hitherto significantly satisfied that demand. When such pieces are withdrawn from the marketplace then Far Eastern buyers will simply buy modern ivory feeding the modern day activities of the poachers, illegal dealers and criminal organisations.

The upcoming legislation is, of course, politically motivated. A beleaguered government with a wafer thin majority is only too willing to adopt a policy which is essentially populist. To fondly imagine it is really based on saving the elephant would be quite wrong. The present government of the UK is even more beleaguered than the elephant population and is only too willing to push through a piece of legislation based upon totally false assumptions.

Hannams ivory basket Museum quality? Almost certainly

 

 

 

 

Qi Baishi becomes the most expensive Chinese painter!

Qi-Baishi-12-Landscape-Screens-WeChat-Image-1024x319

The painter Qi Baishi became the first Chinese artist to join the £100 million club at the end of last year. The week before Christmas, a set of ink brush panels entitled Twelve Landscape Screens (1925), sold for a staggering 931.5 million yuan (well over £100m.) at the Poly Beijing auction house. It is the highest price ever paid for a work of Chinese art at auction.

Only a dozen or so other works—by artists  like Warhol, Picasso and van Gogh—have sold at auction for more than the equivalent of £100 million, although a number of others have reportedly been sold privately in that price area.

There is no doubt that this work was particularly interesting and probably represented value for money as, effectively, the purchaser (unknown) did get twelve pictures for the price of one.

Fantastic animal brings festive cheer

Screenshot_20171214-235448 Fantastic animals are part of the Chinese pantheon and have long been so. This one, however, can be said to be truly fantastic with a distinctly modern twist. It was spotted recently outside the Asian Art Museum in San Francisco. Hung Yi’s Dragon Fortune is inscribed with Chinese expressions of good fortune, breathing vibrant colours and auspicious blessings on the doorstep of the Asain Art Museum.

Reproduced courtesy of the Twitter feed @asianartmuseum

Magnificent obession: the British and Chinese wallpaper

chinese wallpaper cover

Book Review Chinese Wallpaper in Great Britain and Ireland by Emile de Bruijn, Philip Wilson Publishers 2017   £30 RRP

This is the first volume in a welcome cooperation between The National Trust and Philip Wilson Publishers which, it is planned, will lead to a wider exposure to the public of some of the valuable and unique furnishings and valuables within the properties held by the NT. We are all, of course, aware of the diligent activities of the Trust in their many fine properties.

Probably, you are less well aware of Philip Wilson Publishers, one of the UK’s best publishers of fine art books. Philip Wilson, the eponymous guiding hand, has been producing some of the most beautiful fine art books for around forty years now. It’s a long time since I last met and talked with Philip.. I can remember exactly where and when it was: in the magnificent imperial-style halls of Zagreb’s Hotel Esplanade, once a stop on the Orient Express route. The circumstances in June 1991 were rather less leisurely. Croatia had just anoounced its independence was was suddenly at war with Belgrade. I booked into the magnificent Esplanade reckoning that it was the building least likely to be destroyed by the Serbian tanks advancing on the Croatian capital. Philip, I guess, stayed there a a matter of course. There we planned our escape from the Yugoslav war. In the event, the tanks stopped before Zagreb and we were afforded the opportunity to get back to dear old Blighty . . .

As usual, Philip Wilson Publishers have excelled with their production of this book on the wallpapers within National Trust properties. Up until now, there was just a slim National Trust brochure on this neglected subject. Now we have a proper book in which the illustration is matched by the scholarship.

You might be forgiven for not having realised the passion which developed, mainly in the 18th century, for all things Chinese. China was an object of committed fascination for the upper classes and by that I mean ‘them who had money’. Porcelain, bronzes, scrolls, furniture and, indeed, wallpaper became the rage. It was not just a matter of simple decoration. Whole rooms or suites would be furnished entirely with Chinese things to create an all pervading environment. Shiploads of goods from China flooded into the UK, not to mention Portugal, France and The Netherlands. The map at the beginning of this book shows 169 country houses which contain Chinese wallpapers. And those are just the ones left after the dilapidations of the 20th century.

Of course, in return, we made the Chinese buy a lot of things they did not really want, opium, perhaps, being the most odious. Maybe the wheel now, though, is going full circle. If you examine this magnificent book’s biblio page you will see that it has been printed . . . in China. We can hardly complain about a book like this being made available.

chinese wallpaper cover dtl

Far East from the Wild West now in the West End (of London, that is)

Sky blue jar (Qianlong mark and period) -2 Magnificent Qianlong mark and period vase from the Cody collection now with Littleton & Hennessy in St. James’s London

Occasionally, you see an object which seems particularly beautiful, an object which deeply intrigues. That’s what I thought when I saw this extraordinary sky blue jar with cobalt blue and white slip ‘dragon and cloud’ decoration in the St James’s premises of Littleton & Hennessy during Asian Art in London.

It is so extraordinary that I somehow thought there must be an interesting story behind such an unusual piece. And, indeed, there is . . .  Mark Slaats, of L&H, tells me the piece was formerly in the Collection of Thomas English Cody (1889-1948), whose great-uncle was the famous Buffalo Bill Cody. Buffalo Bill Cody may have brought the Wild West to American audiences; Thomas English Cody brought the Far East to America. In the 1930s, the singer and actor was an avid collector of of Chinese porcelain and hardstone objects and he took his collection to the US, where it was recently dispersed.

The sky blue jar illustrated above has now returned to the UK courtesy of L&H.  A modest 19cm in height, it is, nevertheless, a stunning piece. And it bears to the base labels from important exhibitions. More details from mark@littletonandhennessy.com.

 

Fresh interpretation of early 20th century Chinese art

Craig Clunas ed Professor Craig Clunas ponders a question from the audience   Photo Paul Harris

Earlier this week, Professor Craig Clunas, Professor of Chinese Art at Oxford University, gave his first lecture in a series of three on 20th century Chinese art for Gresham College (founded 1597). It was a public lecture (with free entry) held at the Museum of London and dealt with the topic China: New Nation, New Art 1911-32.

Clunas took as his starting point a highly unusual painting entitled simply Viewing Pictures (1917) by Chen Shizeng (1876-1923) which proved to be particularly apposite to the topic. It was outstanding as a piece of social observation and both stylistically and subject-wise was untypical not just of Shizeng’s oeuvre, but also that of other painters of the day. The painting includes both Chinese and Western visitors to The National Museum at a private view of the type that probably survives little changed to this day. In 1918, however, such an interaction would have been highly unusual and the picture presages the great changes about to take place, the meeting of East and West in artistic terms.

Craig Clinas Chen Shizeng Viewing Pictures                                   Chen Shizeng Viewing Pictures (1917)

I suppose that many of us had, to a very great extent, hitherto ascribed developments in Chinese art after the First World War directly to the influences of Europe, generally, and Paris, specifically. Clunas, however, brought something of a fresh perspective which has widened my own personal vision and, I suspect, that of most of the audience. He examined on some detail guohua (national painting) and the developments that took place in that arena, singling out some dramatic images which clearly demonstrated filtered influences from Europe.

I was particularly intrigued by the Liu Haisu painting Qianmen Gate: a dramatic image of the towering bulk of the architectural mass that was the gate with turbulent clouds behind. If I had been obliged to guess the name of the artist, I would probably have come out with Frank Brangwyn!

Liu Haisu Tianneman Gate Liu Haisu Qianmen Gate

Clunas used two devices to progress his analysis of the period 1911-32. He delved deep into the pages of the Shanghai art magazine Liangyou Luabao, which is the sole source for many images of paintings lost in the turbulent tide of Chinese modern history, and he chose two painters to tell the story: Xu Beihong (1895-1953), particularly, and, to a lesser extent Lin Fengmian (1900-91). It is his view that Beihong, known simply to millions as the man who painted furipusly galloping horses, was central to the development of Chinese art during the 1920s (“a massive influence”). Quite apart from his writing and educational work, he was responsible in large part for the introduction of Western artistic materials to China.

Xu Beihong              Xu Beihong Self Portrait

Professor Clunas will give two further lectures for Gresham College at The Museum of London on February 19 and May 14 2018 under the titles China: Art, War and Salvation 1933-49 and China: Art, Power and Revolutions 1950-76.

Bonhams emerge as top player in The Big Three after Asian Art in London

Last week’s Asian Art in London was particularly notable for witnessing the emergence of Bonhams auction house as the top player, historically regarded as No. 3 after Sotheby’s and Christie’s. Recent months have seen its more famous rivals grappling with problems financial and organisational and the evidence strongly suggests that Bonhams have cleverly snuck in to grab the laurels.

Bonhams Fine Chinese Art sale at New Bond Street London on November 9 made £11,971,313, the highest total for an Asian art auction in London last week.

Leading the Bonhams sale was a set of four Huanghuali Folding Chairs that achieved a well-nigh incredible £5,296,250, winning the accolade for the most valuable Asian work of art to be sold last week in London. As one wag put it, ‘Not bad for a set of deckchairs !’

4 chairs bonhams

The folding chairs appear to be the only known version of this form and type, and may now be considered a masterpiece of Ming Dynasty furniture. They had been estimated at £150,000 – 200,000 and came from an Italian aristocratic vendor. In a packed saleroom, the bidding war finally came down to a tense battle between a bidder in the room and one on the phone, with the chairs finally knocked down to the phone bidder.

The chairs came from the collection of the distinguished Italian diplomat, Marchese Taliani de Marchio, (1887 – 1968) and his wife, Maragaretha, the Archduchess d’Austria Toscana (1894 – 1986). From 1938 to 1946, Taliani served as Ambassador to the Nationalist Chiang Kai-shek Government. Despite spending only eight years in China, the Talianis were shrewd and gifted connoisseurs who assembled a collection of extremely important pieces that convey the rich history of Chinese decorative arts. 

An important and exceedingly rare pair of Huanghuali Tapering Cabinets from the Ming Dynasty from the same collection, estimated at £200,000-300,000, sold for a remarkable price of £1,688,750.

Bonhams International Head of Chinese Art, Asaph Hyman said, “The exceptional prices realised for the rare set of folding chairs and the pair of cabinets are amongst the highest ever achieved for Chinese furniture, a result that reflects their importance. We feel very privileged to have been entrusted with this historic collection.”

Earlier in the week on 6 and 7 November, Bonhams Asian Art sale at Knightsbridge made £2,377,150. The top lot was a famille rose scholar and fisherman dish that sold for £93,750.

Thursday November 9 turned out to be an auspicious day for Bonhams. That evening it was awarded the prestigious Asian Art in London prize for the outstanding work of art offered by an auction house. It was presented to Suzannah Yip, Director of Bonhams Japanese Department, at AAL’s Gala Evening at the British Museum. It was a joint winner with Chiswick Auctions.

The prize-winning object was a beautiful roiro – black lacquer panel – by Shibata Zeshin (1807-91). The panel is decorated with bell crickets on grasses growing on a bank, set against a silver lacquer full moon, and embellished with silver dewdrops.

The award – sponsored by Apollo Magazine and the Antiques Trade Gazette – was judged by museum curators from the Ashmolean Museum, Oxford, Fitzwilliam Museum, Cambridge and Victoria and Albert Museum, London, together with representatives from the sponsors Apollo magazine and Antiques Trade Gazette.

20171108_180114 William Sargent addresses a packedroom at Bonhams London on November 8      Photo Paul Harris

It should also be noted that Bonhams took the opportunity of AAL to mount a series of receptions, lectures and special exhibitions. Most impressive was a display of Chinese tureens made for the Spanish Nobility, which was accompanied by a lecture from William R Sargent, formerly at the Peabody Essex Museum.

All in all, a great performance from Bonhams and a shot across the bows of Sotheby’s and Christie’s who, as one observer put it, ‘will need to buck their ideas up.’

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One of the Fantastic Creatures on display at Bonham’s, London.  Photo Paul Harris

Here is our pick of Asian Art in London at 20

We spent four days seeing as much as we could of the 20th year of Asian Art in London, a veritable panoply of wonderful things on display and many on offer. Here are our favorite objects and exhibits, in no particular order.

20171109_160458 Eskenazi Limestone Hands being a portion of a much larger funerary piece and curiously modern in its appearance. Northern Qi period 550-575. Xiangtangshan Cave Temples. From Eskenazi’s exhibition of Six Dynasties Art from the Norman A Kurland Collection.  Photo Paul Harris

20171109_160633 Eskenazi Two Caparisoned Horses From the same outstanding exhibition, two painted earthenware horses, Northern Qi. Photo Paul Harris

20171109_160903 Eskenazi  Two Figures Earthenware Northern Wei period (early 8th century). As with all the Eskenazi exhibits, superb lighting which made photography a delight! Photo Paul Harris

20171110_105831Marchant  Kangxi Famille Verte Within their Kensington Church Street premises old-established dealers Marchant held a breathtaking exhibition of Kangxi famille verte pieces put together by them from stock items dating back more than a decade and including several bearing the provenance of The Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York. A great show.  Photo Paul Harris

20171109_155703 Ben Janssens  Their lease at an end in their Jermyn Street premises, Ben Janssens put on his show, as usual marked by the exquisite small objects on display, in temporary space in Old Bond Street. We particularly liked the exhibit in the foreground Group of Black Pottery Horses, Figures and a Carriage (Yuan Dynasty 1279-1368).  Photo Paul Harris

20171109_162345 Berwald Our attention was grabbed by this evocative rendering of a Silk Road mercant and his camel. Tang Dynasty. Photo Paul Harris

20171110_161203 Cohen & Cohen showed their usual large selection of Chinese export pieces, this time in the capacious premises of Colnaghis in St James’s which served to show off the exhibits at their best. Probably the most eyecatching was a pair of wall sconces, design attributed to Cornelius Pronck (1736-40) and entitled The Flamethrower. If you need to ask the price, you can’t afford it . . . offers please in the region of £280,000 for these exquisite pieces.   Photo Paul Harris

20171109_132648East Meets West Exhibition at The Design Centre in Chelsea concentrating on the work of contemporary young Japanese and Chinese artists. Centre, The Winter at Lianghe Village (2011) a woodcut  by Yu Chengyou.  Photo Paul Harris

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Asian Art in London celebrates in style in the wake of Her Majesty!

20171109_195543 Roger Keverne, AAL Chairman (right), looks pleased as he makes a point at the Asian Art in London 20th Anniversary Gala Party held in the British Museum’s Joseph Hutong Gallery on Thursday evening.  Photo Paul Harris.

 

The AAL Gala Party is normally a glittering affair and the 20th Birthday Party held on Thursday probably excelled itself. Around 450 celebrants crowded into the newly renovated and redesigned Joseph Hutong Gallery of Chinese and South Asian Art at London’s British Museum. This was very much a preview. The Gallery does not fully open to the public until December and just one rather important visitor sprang in ahead of AAL the day previously, HM Queen Elizabeth II (and rightly so!).

So the surroundings were impeccable, the exhibits on show stunning and, as usual, the champagne flowed in unlimited quantities, fully justifying the £70 ticket price! All was in sharp contrast to last year’s event which took place in a cafeteria atmosphere in Chinatown.

AAL Chairman Roger Keverne, who will resign in December, at which time the Board of AAL will vote on his successor, compered and, in association with Director Virginia Sykes-Wright, introduced this year’s winners of the AAL Awards. The auctioneer section was shared by Bonhams, one of The Big Three, and Chiswick Auctions, which is emerging as a cheeky challenger to the giants – it has just opened up in South Ken and, in the wake of Christie’s abandoning its operations there, has adopted the acronym CSK. Eat your heart out, Christies!

In the dealer category, there was a very popular award to Priestley & Ferraro. David Priestley took the award which came directly as a result of their stunning display of Early Chinese Carved Cinnabar Lacquer entitled The Deeper Picture and which ran through AAL in the lower floor of their premises in St James’s.

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David Priestley clutches his well deserved Dealer Award at Thursday evening’s Asian Art in London 20th Birthday party. Pictured with Roger Keverne and the Editor of Apollo Magazine, Thomas Marks.    Photo Paul Harris

Asian Art in London is in full swing aged 20

The annual celebration Asian Art in London is currently in full swing and visitors are clearly enjoying the 20th anniversary of the event. Doubtless the 21st next year will be equally as enthusiastically celebrated, if not more!

There is the usual mix of private gallery exhibitions, open evenings, auctions of Asian art and public events. For some, the highlight is the champagne reception on the evening of Thursday November 9. This year it takes place in the auguste surroundings of The British Museum, in the newly inaugurated Joseph Hutong Gallery. This exhibition space seems bound to be a long lasting hit with Asian art lovers.

This weekend we shall be posting news and pictures from AAL.

Twelve years, twelve great treasures Woolley & Wallis record their success in a new book

Woolley book cover  Cover of the newly released Wooley and Wallis celebratory volume

There are two times of the year when there is the relentless thud of heavy packages hitting the floor below our capacious letter box. One of those times is April, ahead of the May sales of Chinese art, and the other is now upon us ahead of Asian Art in London (November 2-11) and the plethora of Chinese art auctions in the UK (curently standing at almost three dozen!).

Some of these catalogues are relatively modest affairs, others are massive heavy objects which bring to mind the story told to me by a former well known editor of The Los Angeles Times. In the 1970s, their paper became so large that one reader sent them a legal missive alleging that the destructive force of their paper had killed his dog on its downward trajectory. They didn’t find it necessary to pay up; that is another story.

The story came to mind last week when the Bonhams Chinese Fine Art Sale (November 9) catalogue popped through the letterbox. At just under 400 pages, and printed on 180gsm paper, although potentially a fearsome weapon, it is, in the event, a treasure trove of exquisite objects.

Rather different was a package from Salisbury auctioneers Woolley & Wallis. It was, by far, the most modest and unassuming of the week.s packages. However, it revealed a most beautiful, slim harback book bound in cloth and stamped in gold. Twelve Years, Twelve Treasures is, effectively, the story of the twelve highest achieving Asian lots handled by W&W. It is a chronicle of some remarkable pieces.

Wooley Alexander vasr

The W&W reputation was on the road to establishment in July 2005 when W&W sold a magnificent Yuan dynasty double-gourd vase for £2,600,000 (above), the record price for any object sold in a UK provincial auction house. It became known as The Alexander Vase after its original UK owner (1876). In May 2009 the record was broken again with an Imperial spinach-green jade water buffalo from the Qianlong period (below), which sold for a hammer price of £3,400,000. It, in turn, would become known as The Pelham Water Buffalo, after its former owner Sackville George Pelham (188-1948).

The May 2010 sale outperformed the equivalent Asian sales at the London salerooms, containing the season’s two top lots and becoming the then highest grossing sale ever at any regional auction house in the UK; a record we were to later beat at our November 2010 sale.

Woolley bull

As might be expected, the reproductions are superb and the text represents an important record of the history of twelve distinguished pieces. The book already occupies a permanent place on my crowded Asian art shelves . . .

You can look at the book online at http://www.woolleyandwallis.co.uk

 

‘Fantastic’ vase with seven figure estimate fails to sell in Glasgow

Mulberry Bank vase

High hopes were dashed today at Glasgow’s Mulberry Bank Auctions as their much vaunted sale of an Imperial yellow Jiaqing vase failed to take off. Estimated at £1.5-2m., the bidding started on the telephone at £650,000. Two telephone bidders were pitted against each other but bidding was slow and petered out at £780,000. Internet bidding was not allowed, which may have been a mistake.

The Glasgow auctioneer, who had repeatedly described the vase as ‘a fantastic piece’, was palpably disappointed and advised the room ‘this is just not going to be enough’. He added, ‘Please contact us after the sale.’

The auctioneers had sent out more than a dozen information packs all over the world. They also averred that it was just as good as a similar vase sold in Hong Kong by Christies at £9m. That may or may not be the case but one London dealer, who did not bid, told us that, in his opinion, ‘the decoration is not that good’.

Mulberry Bank will doubtless hope that it can be sold by private treaty in the coming days. It is understood to have a reserve in the region of £1m.

Mulberry Bank vase base Mulberry Bank vase mark

The catalogue entry for the vase reads as follows:

VERY RARE EARLY JAIQING (1796 – 1820) IMPERIAL CHINESE YELLOW GROUND FAMILLE ROSE BOTTLE VASE BEARING QIANLONG BLUE FOUR CHARACTER SEALMARK Profusely decorated in colourful enamels with four large blossoming lotus around the lower body, the neck with iron red and blue bats suspending intertwined wan emblems, ruyi and further lotus, all on a lemon yellow ground, with out-curved shaped rim decorated with ruyi, raised on a circular foot decorated with petals, the base bearing labels for ‘Dartington Hall Chinese Exhibition 1965’ and ‘J.A.G. Saunders Collection – 631’, 32.5cm high Notes The vase dates from the very early Jiaqing reign but bears the Qianlong mark, which was not uncommon on these early transitional pieces. Turned-down ruyi mouths of this type are rare on porcelain vessels, as they would have been difficult to make and fire successfully. These mouths seen on Ming and Qing dynasty porcelains may ultimately derive from the vases with lobed turned-down mouths made in the 12th and 13th centuries. The distinctive ruyi shape of the mouth on vessels such as the current vase appears to be a Qianlong innovation, an example of which can be seen in the Palace Museum Beijing. A very similar example was sold by Christie’s as part of the Fonthill Collection. It was sold on 1st December 2010 in Hong Kong as lot 2981and achieved HKD90,260,000. The similarity between the two vases could even suggest that they are from the same kiln and potter. The decoration on the vase includes various auspicious emblems: upside-down bats symbolising the arrival of happiness. This happiness is multiplied by the wan characters, meaning ten thousand, which hang from the ribbons. These same ribbons are slotted through ruyi, from which in turn lotus blossoms are suspended. The ruyi symbolises ‘everything as you wish’, while the lotus is a Buddhist symbol of purity and beauty. Provenance J.A.G Saunders Collection label – Sir John Saunders CBE, DSO, MC (1917-2002) was chairman of the Hong Kong and Shanghai Banking Corporation from 1962 – 1972. Sold in 1982 to a private collector by renowned American dealer Charlie Gerhardt.

THIS LOT IS NOT AVAILABLE FOR ONLINE BIDDING PLEASE CONTACT THE AUCTION HOUSE DIRECTLY ON 0141 225 8181 FOR FURTHER INFORMATION.